World Computer Congress 2010 - News, Features, and Slideshows

World Computer Congress 2010 in pictures

  • In Pictures: World Computer Congress 2010

    In Pictures: World Computer Congress 2010

    The International Federation for Information Processing's (IFIP) biannual World Computer Congress was held in Brisbane this year. The event attracted approximately 1100 attendees globally, but some have <a href="http://www.computerworld.com.au/article/361864/world_computer_congress_raises_questions_business_industry_relevance/">questioned its relevance to industry and business</a>.

  • Protesters crash World Computing Congress

    Protesters crash World Computing Congress

    Protesters have gate-crashed the World Computing Congress with two individuals handing out leaflets and parading banners at the talk "what are the "big" issues in IP in relation to computing technology?" from Ralf Abbing of the Netherlands.

News about World Computer Congress 2010
  • In Pictures: World Computer Congress 2010

    The International Federation for Information Processing's (IFIP) biannual World Computer Congress was held in Brisbane this year. The event attracted approximately 1100 attendees globally, but some have <a href="http://www.computerworld.com.au/article/361864/world_computer_congress_raises_questions_business_industry_relevance/">questioned its relevance to industry and business</a>.

  • WCC2010: E-health to be held back by doctors?

    Technophobic healthcare practitioners along with immature technology could be preventing the accelerated rollout of e-health in Australia, according to one e-health industry expert.

  • Change management key to e-health

    The ultimate success of e-health programs in Australia will come down to how change management and adoption processes are put in place for clinicians, patients and politicians alike, a key industry leader told attendees of the World Computer Congress 2010 in Brisbane this week.

  • When IT governance goes wrong

    Speaking the World Computer Congress 2010 in Brisbane this week, Cathy Blunt, manager of Griffith University’s internal audit office, provided an interesting insight into the main contributing factors to failed or inefficient IT products in government agencies. The public university has itself undergone internal changes to prevent similar failures, though Blunt wasn’t shy of self-criticism in her review of what sends government IT projects over the edge.