Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) - News, Features, and Slideshows

News

  • CBRE eyes expanded VDI footprint in APAC

    NYSE-listed real estate services CBRE is continuing to expand its virtual desktop infrastructure in the Asia-Pacific region. The Fortune 500 company has some 1500 end points in Asia and Australia and it is expecting this to increase to 6000 within 12 months.

  • Finish line approaches for Hyundai virtual desktop rollout

    Hyundai's Australian subsidiary is close to completing a company-wide VDI rollout. Head of IT at Hyundai Motor Company Australia, Bala Kothandaraman, said that virtual desktops had been rolled out to around 45 per cent of the organisation's 200 end users, with the remainder to transition in two months.

  • Christchurch law firm adopts VDI after earthquake

    After catastrophic earthquakes in Christchurch toppled its New Zealand law office, Duncan Cotterill implemented desktop virtualization to provide stronger disaster resilience, according to the law firm’s CIO at the time.

  • TransGrid switches on desktop virtualisation

    NSW electricity grid operator, TransGrid, will move as many as 500 of its desktop PCs to virtualised thin clients in an effort to reduce costs and extend the hardware refresh cycle to seven years.

  • IBM rolls out virtual desktop offering

    With an eye on the small and medium-sized business market, IBM is working through resellers to roll out a VDI (virtual desktop infrastructure) package that costs US$150 per user annually.

  • Making the leap to virtual desktop infrastructure

    The utopian vision of a fluid and easily managed desktop infrastructure has floated around IT since the dawn of the desktop era. There have been many attempts at corralling the desktop hydra, but none have provided a universal solution. Microsoft Terminal Services, Citrix XenApp, and a host of others have found markets, but the quest for desktop salvation continues.

  • VDI provides flexibility, but at a cost

    Virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) may be the most flexible way to deploy remote desktops, but traditional terminal servers win on cost, a remote desktop specialist asserted in a talk at Microsoft's Tech Ed conference this week in New Orleans.