freemium - News, Features, and Slideshows

News

  • Enterasys CEO: Total cost of ownership sets us apart

    How's this for a challenge? The CEO dies suddenly and you're tabbed to take his place -- on the heels of your network infrastructure company entering into a major new strategic partnership and in the midst of the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression. Oh, did I mention your competition includes some companies named <a href="http://www.networkworld.com/subnets/cisco/">Cisco</a> Systems, Hewlett-Packard and Juniper Networks, among others? That's life for Chris Crowell, CEO of Enterasys Networks, who took over in 2009 shortly after predecessor <a href="http://www.networkworld.com/news/2008/092408-fabiaschi-dies.html">Mike Fabiaschi's untimely death</a>. Since then, Crowell has refreshed Enterasys' product line, pushed for the development of innovative new <a href="http://www.networkworld.com/news/2011/060811-enterasys-isaac.html">social media-based</a> <a href="http://www.networkworld.com/topics/network-management.html">network management</a> capabilities that promise to make life easier for network admins, and achieved record sales in the last financial quarter. In this latest installment of the <a href="http://www.networkworld.com/keywords/ceo-interviews.html">IDG Enterprise CEO Interview Series</a>, Crowell spoke with IDGE Chief Content Officer John Gallant about how Enterasys is competing against networking's big dogs, explored an upcoming fabric launch expected in October and talked about the company's <a href="http://www.networkworld.com/news/2008/072908-siemens-enterasys.html?hpg1=bn%25252520">partnership with Siemens Enterprise Communications</a>. He also explained why "Isaac" is so important and where Enterasys plans to take the technology.

  • Build BI tools fast with agile approach

    Feeling like your business intelligence effort is a bit sluggish and out of touch with what the business needs? Maybe it's time to try agile BI, a rapid development methodology that solicits end-user input early and often, and delivers BI systems fast.

  • Cloud cures hospital's ailing email system

    When Debbie Cancilla took charge of the IT operation at Grady Health System, which operates one of the largest public hospitals in the U.S., she inherited an email system that had become a nightmare for doctors, nurses and administrators.

  • Riverbed Whitewater: Data deduplication for cloud storage

    Cloud storage seems like such a no-brainer for backups and disaster recovery, it's a wonder that more businesses aren't taking advantage of it. If you're concerned about cloud outages, cloud storage costs, data loss, data security, or the ability to push your nightly backup sets up the Internet straw, Riverbed Technology's Whitewater appliance may make cloud storage easier to embrace.

  • Superior storage for small networks

    The Netgear ReadyNAS series of network attached storage units serve as a prime example of how the industry has changed over the years. They were originally a product of Infrant Technologies, a veteran of mainframe disk subsystems that poured decades of serious storage experience into the small drive system for SMBs. Nearly four years into Infrant's acquisition by Netgear in May 2007, the ReadyNAS line now stretches from SOHO to enterprise NAS.

  • Windows Small Business Server 2011 shines

    Many small businesses have relied on Microsoft's Small Business Server (SBS) family of servers to get their feet wet with their first server and network. Introduced back in 1997 as BackOffice Small Business Server 4.0, SBS has matured into a tightly integrated platform of the most important services a small company needs: file and printer functions, email, calendar and contact sharing, and document collaboration. While it is limited in the maximum number of concurrent user connections, SBS doesn't shirk core services, providing enterprise-grade features at a price point almost every small business can afford.

  • Rack-mount QNAP storage server packs a wallop

    There's an area of the NAS landscape where the lines between consumer and corporate use are blurred. While high-end NAS arrays cost plenty of money, they also provide essential features like redundant power supplies and superior performance. At the lower end are the truly consumer-grade devices that might seem like they'll work in a corporate environment but fall short of meeting the essentials critical to infrastructures. They are, however, very cheap.

  • Verdict in Oracle-SAP suit poses threat to IT

    Last month's federal jury verdict awarding Oracle Corp. $1.3 billion in its corporate theft lawsuit against SAP AG could prove harmful to both enterprise users and third-party support providers, analysts and IT executives say.

  • HoneyPoint: Honeypot for Windows, Linux or Mac

    After over 10 years of active participation in the honeypot community, I was surprised not to have heard of MicroSolved's HoneyPoint Security Server before I started planning this roundup. HoneyPoint runs on Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X, and offers some useful features -- such as "defensive fuzzing" and the ability to track alert status -- that KFSensor and Honeyd don't. But HoneyPoint is neither as easy and complete as KFSensor, nor as flexible and scalable as Honeyd.

  • Are Apple's iPhone and iPad relevant to enterprises?

    The conventional wisdom is that enterprises aren't impressed by Apple's shiny iDevices, perceiving them as a consumer play. Is that a fair assessment? And if so, could it change in the foreseeable future? Let's take a look, in The Long View ...

  • IT seeks a safe road to the cloud

    The road map for expanding enterprise use of cloud computing is being drawn by IT executives like Mark Stone, CIO at Safety-Kleen Systems Inc.