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News

  • Off to a Fast Start

    Feeling like your business intelligence efforts are a bit sluggish and out of touch with what the company needs? Maybe it's time to try agile BI, a rapid development methodology that solicits end-user input early and often and delivers BI systems fast.

  • Enterprises slow to join voice-recognition surge

    Amazon's recent purchase of Yap, a maker of voice recognition technology, and the arrival of Siri speech software inside Apple's iPhone 4S smartphone has sparked heightened consumer interest in voice commands for smartphones and tablets.

  • Cisco how-to guides for firewalls, IPv6, contact centers and security exams

    If you're ready for a technical deep dive in a book, the Cisco Networking Technology Series provides that in its collection of volumes on topics that include Cisco firewalls, Cisco Unity Connection voice-messaging platform, Cisco Contact Center, <a href="http://www.networkworld.com/news/2009/073009-ipv6-guide.html">IPv6</a> and more. Here's a quick review of the books published in this series by Cisco Press this year.

  • How to get IPv6 addresses from ARIN

    Whenever I help a company deploy IPv6, the first question I'm asked is how to get provider independent IPv6 address space from ARIN. ARIN has new <a href="https://www.arin.net/policy/nrpm.html#six58">policy guidelines</a> that affect how a company approaches its allocation justification request for IPv6 vs. what was required for IPv4.

  • Linux loses its luster as a darling among developers

    Linux had a big birthday recently -- its 20th -- but the event may have been a tad bittersweet for its most devoted fans. According to recent results of the annual application development survey from Santa Cruz, Calif.-based researcher <a href="http://www.evansdata.com/">Evans Data Corp.</a> , Linux has slipped to third place in popularity, behind Mac OS and, of course, Windows.

  • Should social networks be blocked at work?

    One of the biggest trends in IT is how consumer products have crept into the enterprise, and the trend extends to Internet services. The ingenious thing about social networks such as Facebook and LinkedIn is that these consumer-oriented sites have become key tools for professionals.

  • Alfresco: An open-source ECM alternative for SharePoint

    In any business organization, the need to effectively communicate and collaborate in a timely manner is very important. Contending with mobile workers and shifting schedules, many businesses look toward enterprise content management (ECM) systems such as <a href="http://sharepoint.microsoft.com/en-us/Pages/default.aspx">Microsoft's SharePoint</a>. Their purpose is to allow users within organizations to collaborate and share work inside of a commonly accessed website framework.

  • Hadoop creator expects surge in interest to continue

    Doug Cutting , the creator of the open-source Hadoop framework that allows enterprises to store and analyze petabytes of unstructured data, led the team that built one of the world's largest Hadoop clusters while he was at Yahoo. The former engineer at Excite, Apple and Xerox PARC is also the developer of Lucene and Nutch, two open-source search engine technologies now being managed by the Apache Foundation. Cutting is now an architect at Cloudera, which sells and supports a commercial version of Hadoop and which this week will host the Hadoop World conference in New York. In an interview, Cutting talked about the reasons for the surging enterprise interest in Hadoop.

  • HP Concludes That Bigger Is Better

    Hewlett-Packard's decision to retain its vast PC division likely offers some insight into the type of company new CEO Meg Whitman and her team want to lead.

  • IBM Quietly Names a New CEO

    IBM Doesn't like drama -- and it proved that late last month when, without fanfare, its board of directors named 30-year company veteran Virginia Rometty to succeed Sam Palmisano as CEO.

  • Talking to the Business: Our Problems, Their Visions

    The first meeting for a project is a tense affair. There can be a lot of new things coming at you all at once. New co-workers. New technology. New processes. And, perhaps most problematic, new business partners.

  • Big data goes mainstream

    We've all heard the predictions: By 2020, the quantity of electronically stored data will reach 35 trillion gigabytes, a forty-four-fold increase from 2009. We had already reached 1.2 million petabytes, or 1.2 zettabytes, by the end of 2010, according to IDC. That's enough data to fill a stack of DVDs reaching from the Earth to the moon and back -- about 240,000 miles each way.

  • Oracle's best-of-breed strategy, as described by president Mark Hurd

    It used to be easy journalistic shorthand to write 'database-giant Oracle Corp.', but that labeling no longer fits a company that's now a key player in applications, appliances, servers, development tools, operating systems and, yes, even cloud computing. How do all these components gel into a coherent plan for IT customers? What makes Oracle better than the other big integrated systems players like HP and IBM? In this latest installment of the IDG Enterprise CEO Interview Series, Oracle President Mark Hurd spoke with IDGE Chief Content Officer John Gallant about Oracle's strategy and why the company is uniquely positioned to help IT leaders deal with the difficult challenges they're facing today. Hurd also clarified Oracle's stance on cloud -- a position clouded -- sorry -- by some earlier comments from CEO Larry Ellison -- and what makes Oracle's approach better than 'very old' cloud solutions like salesforce.com. He explained more about customer migrations to Oracle's new Fusion applications and discussed how Oracle plans to win in the evolving server market.