Defcon - News, Features, and Slideshows

News

  • Ten scary hacks I saw at Black Hat and DEF CON

    Security researchers and hackers gathered in Las Vegas over the past week to show off and learn about the latest vulnerabilities that affect devices and software that the world relies on every day. Black Hat and DEF CON, the world's top security conferences, did not disappoint.

  • Is your Dropcam live feed being watched by someone else?

    Dropcam, the popular video monitoring camera, bills itself as "super simple security." But a pair of researchers plan to show at the Defcon hacking conference later this week how having a Dropcam could get a lot more complicated.

  • TrustyCon vs. RSA and NSA: New conference pushes trustworthy agenda

    Who do you trust? That's a question asked increasingly by a security industry with a growing sense that the National Security Agency (NSA) has sought to weaken encryption or get backdoors into computers, based on documents leaked by Edward Snowden to the media. Now, trust is also the theme of a new conference called TrustyCon that will vie for attention on Feb. 27 in San Francisco while the big RSA Conference for security pros is also taking place in that city.

  • 10 scariest hacks from Black Hat and Defcon

    Hack week in Vegas

    During the Black Hat and Defcon conferences in Las Vegas last week, researchers wheeled out their best new attacks on everything from browsers to automobiles, demonstrating ingenuity and diligence in circumventing security efforts or in some cases in exploiting systems that were built without security in mind. Here's a handful of the ones that deserve the most concern.

  • Defcon: The lesson of Anonymous? Corporate security sucks

    LAS VEGAS -- Anonymous has run up quite a score against corporations, governments and law enforcement agencies, but for all these warnings corporate executives are turning their heads from the real problem -- their network security is terrible, a panel of experts concluded at Defcon.

  • Researchers show off homemade spy drone at Black Hat

    LAS VEGAS -- Two security researchers Wednesday unveiled a remote controlled, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) that is capable of cracking Wi-Fi passwords, exploiting weak wireless access points and mimicking a GSM tower to intercept cell phone conversations.