Consumer Electronics Association - News, Features, and Slideshows

News

  • Trade groups look for uses for recycled CRT glass

    An electronics and a recycling trade group are looking for ways to reuse recycled cathode ray tube (CRT) glass from computer monitors and television sets, with a US$10,000 prize for the best proposal.

  • FCC chairman announces his resignation

    U.S. Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski announced Friday he will soon step down, following months of rumors that he would resign early this year.

  • House hearing on Stop Online Piracy Act scheduled

    The U.S. House of Representatives Judiciary Committee will conduct a hearing on the controversial copyright enforcement bill, the Stop Online Piracy Act, on Wednesday, the committee has announced.

  • Debate on new copyright enforcement bill heats up

    Supporters of a controversial copyright protection bill recently introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives are firing back after several digital rights groups have suggested the legislation could lead to law enforcement officials targeting sites like YouTube and Twitter.

  • Opposition to Stop Online Piracy Act grows

    A coalition of technology trade groups today joined the growing chorus of voices opposing a recently filed <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9221232/New_bill_would_target_websites_enabling_copyright_infringement">anti-piracy bill</a> that they contend is far too heavy-handed.

  • Group: New version of PROTECT IP may target legal sites

    An upcoming version of U.S. legislation designed to combat copyright infringement on the Web may include provisions that hold online services such as Twitter, Facebook and YouTube legally responsible for infringing material posted by users, according to one group opposed to the bill.

  • Group: Spectrum plan could shut down TV stations

    A U.S. Federal Communications Commission proposal to transfer 120MHz of television spectrum from broadcasters to mobile broadband carriers could require more than 800 TV stations to change channels and could drive more than 200 off the air permanently, according to a trade group.

  • Trade group sets off debate over spectrum 'hoarding'

    The National Association of Broadcasters, asked by the U.S. Federal Communications Commission and some lawmakers to give up television spectrum for mobile data uses, has fired back by accusing several other companies of hoarding the spectrum they hold.