Slideshow

In Pictures: What’s hot with 3D printers?

3D printed guns, candy and cars top the list.

  • 3D printing is rapidly changing a number of technologies and the way we think about making things like candy or cars even. As feared 3D printing can have a dark side as last week Yoshimoto Imura became the first man to be arrested in Japan for illegal possession of two guns he created himself using 3D printing technology. Here’s a look at some other hot 3D news.

  • Seized plastic handguns which were created using 3D printing technology are displayed at Kanagawa police station in Yokohama, south of Tokyo, in this photo taken by Kyodo May 8, 2014. Yoshimoto Imura became the first man to be arrested in Japan for illegal possession of two guns he created himself using 3D printing technology. Reuters says the 27-year-old, a college employee in the city of Kawasaki, was arrested after police found video online posted by Imura claiming to have produced his own guns. Gun possession is strictly regulated in Japan. Police raided Imura's home and found five guns, two of which could fire real bullets, Japanese media said.

  • 3D Systems, a maker of personal and professional 3D printers, this year signed an agreement with The Hershey Company, maker of some of the country's most popular candies, to explore 3D printing of food, including candy.

  • Physicist Urs Duerig uses tweezers to hold a silicon tip with a sharp apex, 100,000 times smaller than a sharpened pencil, of a prototype of an IBM NanoFrazor 3D nano printing tool at a laboratory of IBM Research.

  • Physicist Urs Duerig looks into a prototype of an IBM NanoFrazor 3D nano printing tool at a laboratory of IBM Research.

  • A MakerBot Replicator 2 desktop 3D printer creates the statue of the late U.S. President Abraham Lincoln at the Lincoln Memorial during a media preview of GE Garage.

  • TechShop representative Andy Leer maintains a MakerBot Replicator 2 desktop 3D printer at the GE Garage in Washington March 20, 2014.

  • MakerBot Replicator 2 desktop 3D printers are calibrated at the GE Garage in Washington.

  • This plastic model of the Charleston, W.Va., post office, was 3D printed and is on display at America Makes, the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute in Youngstown, Ohio. Along the banks of the Mahoning River in the struggling Ohio steel town of Youngstown sits a once-abandoned furniture warehouse that has been converted into a sleek new laboratory. Inside is a Silicon Valley-style workspace complete with open meeting areas and colorful stools. Several 3-D printers hum in the background, while engineers type computer codes that tell the machines how to create objects by layering materials.

  • An employee pulls plastic refuse material from a 3D printed cube he designed at America Makes, the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute Rogers is a sophomore in chemical engineering at the University of Toledo.

  • Intern Jim D'Andrea detaches plastic planetary gears after they were 3D printed at America Makes, the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute.

  • Kevin Collier scans several small models, which can then be digitally manipulated and 3D printed.

  • A general view of a plastic duct which was 3D printed at America Makes, the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute.

  • An exhibitor adjusts the printing head of a Fabmaker 3D printer.

  • A staff member of Nihonbinary demonstrates their 3D printer MakerBot Replicator 2X as it prints an Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene pylon during the International Robot Exhibition.

  • A staff of Nihonbinary shows an Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene pylon which is printed by the 3D printer MakerBot Replicator 2X.

  • An Airbus employee presents three model airplanes in blue, white and red, made from starch using a 3D printing technique.

  • Online, you can view how a finished 3D model might look before printing. Honda recently unveiled Honda-3D.com as a portal for 3D-printable STL (Stereolithography) files. The downloads currently consist of a handful of Honda concept cars, including an upcoming Acura NSX, and older ones like the quirky Puyo concept from 2007, and the FSR from the 90's. You can load the model into one of several new Windows 8 apps like 3D Builder or STL Viewer, many of them free. Once you have the 14-foot scale model of the NSX loaded, for instance, you can resize it at will, change the design and colors, and send it to a 3D printer.

  • Graphic explains how inkjet 3D printing works.

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