Slideshow

In pictures: Australia's UAV challenge

Aviation enthusiasts gathered with their unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) at Kingaroy airport to compete for cash prizes totalling $70,000

  • The CSIRO is encouraging the development of technologies that will allow safe, and cost-effective operation of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV). Photo credit: Stefan Hrabar, CSIRO

  • The UAV Challenge, dubbed 'Outback Rescue', was an initiative of the Queensland Government and the Australian Research Centre for Aerospace Automation (ARCAA), a partnership between CSIRO and Queensland University of Technology. Photo credit: Stefan Hrabar, CSIRO

  • In the headline event, UAVs must search two and a half kilometres from the airport for a lost bushwalker and deliver a bottle of water to him. Photo credit: Stefan Hrabar, CSIRO

  • For the first time in the three year history of this event, two UAVs managed to fly out of Kingaroy Airport, which was closed for the event. Photo credit: Stefan Hrabar, CSIRO

  • Jonathan Roberts of the CSIRO ICT Centre and one of the organisers of the event, said: "As part of ARCAA, we're working with Boeing, one of the sponsors of this event, on how UAVs and manned aircraft can operate together in civilian airspace." Photo credit: Stefan Hrabar, CSIRO

  • The CSIRO maintain a strong focus on the dependability of UAV systems to address the challenges of pilot-less helicopter operations in unknown environments. Photo credit: Stefan Hrabar, CSIRO

  • Reliable UAV operation requires dependable hardware and software, precise flight control, robust state estimation, obstacle avoidance, autonomous planning, reasoning and decision making, and a high-level interface to allow the mission to be specified by a non-expert operator. Photo credit: Stefan Hrabar, CSIRO

  • A mannequin dubbed Outback Joe, that played the role of the lost bushwalker. Photo credit: Stefan Hrabar, CSIRO

  • During one day of this year's event there was a record 45 manned aircraft movements from Kingaroy airport. Photo credit: Stefan Hrabar, CSIRO

  • UAVs may be used for search and rescue, environmental research and crop monitoring. Photo credit: Stefan Hrabar, CSIRO

  • The CSIRO's UAV research team are at work on the Smart Skies project, http://www.smartskies.com.au. Photo credit: Stefan Hrabar, CSIRO

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