Stories by Serdar Yegulalp

The best Android apps for boosting battery life

The single most common complaint you'll hear about any smartphone is how lousy the battery life is. Granted, battery life is like mileage on a car - it will vary widely depending on your usage. You can always buy more time by making fewer calls or downloading less data. But then, you probably carry your smartphone in order to use it.

4 simple steps to bulletproof laptop security

Security: You either have it you don't. It's a matter of degrees or, as the experts prefer to think of it, layers. The more varieties of security you have, the better the odds your goods can be protected successfully from intrusion or theft.

Speech recognition: Your smartphone gets smarter

When we were kids, my friends and I used to play a game where we fantasized about which technologies from Star Trek were most likely to be real-world inventions within our lifetimes. The transporter and warp drive -- not likely. But the communicator, the voice-commanded computer and the universal translator -- very likely.

Making money with mobile apps

To many companies and independent developers -- not just software publishers -- mobile apps represent something even more powerful and important than a brand-new platform to deploy apps on. It's a new and dynamic source of revenue, one with a lot of room to grow. And given how tough it can be to make money selling software at all, especially in this world of open-source and free Web apps, any proven way to make money in that field can become a magnet.

Free desktop tools that aren't OpenOffice

Most everyone who's had some experience with free open source software has learned about the OpenOffice.org suite of productivity programs: a word processor, spreadsheet, presentation, database, and drawing tool that provide a good deal of the functionality of their commercial counterparts. For users who need powerful productivity tools but don't require a high degree of compatibility with Microsoft-formatted files, OpenOffice.org is almost a no-brainer.

Diaspora: First peek at Facebook's challenger

When word began to circulate about <a href="http://blogs.computerworld.com/16974/diaspora_its_no_facebook_yet">Diaspora</a>, the hype about it being a potential <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9157638/Facebook_Complete_coverage">Facebook</a> killer took on a life of its own before a single line of code had been released. Now the <a href="http://www.joindiaspora.com/">first developer's alpha version of Diaspora</a> is out in the wild, and the hype is being replaced with scrutiny and well-deserved skepticism.

Netbooks vs. iPads -- can they coexist?

The term "disruptive," a common buzzword in tech journalism, is typically used to describe something that jars people out of existing ways of doing things, and provides them with both new ways to do the old things and new things to do. Weather-beaten as the expression might be, it fits when talking about two products that took personal computing by storm over the past couple of years: the iPad and the netbook.

Crash course: HTML 5 video

If you want to watch Internet-delivered video on your PC, the vast majority of Web sites have settled on a single, consistent way to do that. That's the good news. The bad news is that this single, consistent delivery system is Adobe Flash, with all its security and stability issues.

Adobe Creative Suite: The history

It's been 20 years since Adobe 1.0 was released, and graphics professionals everywhere are still using Adobe's products to produce videos, Web sites, images and other creative material. We've taken a look back to see where Adobe Creative Suite has been and where it's going.

Taking the good stuff when trading Windows for Linux

So you're switching from Windows to Linux? Great. Like other users and organizations who've taken the plunge, it's likely you're making the move to take advantage of Linux's stability and reliance on open standards. Now all you have to do is prepare carefully for your move.