Stories by David Coursey

New Dell mobile devices a dubious prospect

If Michael Dell decides to release a new Android-based handheld device, as the Wall Street Journal speculates he might, it will be his fourth try at entering the market and he will almost certainly fail, if his track record is a guide to his future.

Palm must beat others to prosper

In saying, "We don't have to beat each other to prosper" during a Thursday call held to discuss the company's fourth-quarter earnings, Palm's new CEO, Jon Rubenstein, has tacitly admitted what many already suspected: Palm won't end up number one in the smartphone race.

Wireless charging comes to iPhone

In less than three weeks, the iPhone has caught up with the Palm Pre in the one area where the Pre held an undisputed lead: wireless charging. The ability to charge without wires is an idea that's been teasing us for a long time, with Palm the first company (I am aware of) to take it mainstream. The feature will soon be available for iPhone users, too.

Blu-Ray, I hardly know ye

There was a time when it looked like HD-DVD would be winner in the battle to bring high-definition to computers and video players. Then the momentum suddenly swung to a competing standard called Blu-ray. Now, it looks like Blu-Ray is in trouble, but not from HD-DVD.

Motorola set to embrace Android with new phones

Motorola plans to release a new line of Android-based handsets in time for holiday sales, potentially rearranging the smartphone market in Google's favour. This is more bad news for Microsoft, which takes a further backseat to Google and could make Palm's supposed ascendency a poorer bet. Apple is unfazed.

Survey finds good news for Apple, bad for BlackBerry

Bad news for Blackberry: Forty per cent of smartphone users who don't already own an iPhone said they would switch to the Apple handset for their next purchase, nearly three times the percentage of non-Blackberry users who would switch to a Research in Motion handset.

iPhone 3G S: My life is still the same, only faster

Not to burst anyone's balloon, but the Phone 3G S isn't a world-changer--unless you've never had an iPhone, of course. For the rest of us, it's simply the world's most successful "speed bump" for an existing product.

Apple iPhone 3.0: Evolution, not revolution

The first iPhone was revolutionary, the first smartphone that really worked. People who expect the iPhone 3GS or yesterday's iPhone 3.0 software upgrade to be equally exciting will be disappointed. Not because the product is bad, but because It's hard for any third release to be as dramatic as the first.

iPhone Availability, Another Snub for AT&T?

The best place to buy the new iPhone 3GS is--surprise!--direct from Apple. Amid concern about delays for AT&amp;T customers, Apple has already begun shipping new iPhones and is still promising <a href="http://www.pcworld.com/article/166727/iphone_3gs_the_s_is_for_speedy_delivery_and_from_shenzhen_too.html">quick delivery for orders placed on its Web site</a>. If AT&amp;T really is facing a short supply of new iPhones, this could be seen as the latest snub Apple has handed the company, its original iPhone launch partner.

Palm Pre: Nowhere to go but down

Ed Colligan is a nice guy and visionary marketer who, nevertheless, deserves blame for most of Palm's problems, including the failed launch of the Palm Pre last weekend. At least by sacrificing Colligan so quickly, that must be what "the new Palm" hopes we'll think.

Real Facebook names will be good for business

People using Facebook in business need to mark their calendars for this Saturday in order to claim their real names on Facebook, if for no other reason than to do it before someone else does.

Apple iPhone: It's all about the apps

If there is a single message from Apple's Monday announcements, it is a simple one: Software sells hardware. Second message? Apple's iPhone has a lot of software available and the Palm Pre, Android, BlackBerry, et al, don't come close.

20 years ago today: birth of the dot-com era

It doesn't seem like it, but 20 years ago today, the dot-com era was born. On June 8, 1989, Brad Templeton, started Clarinet.com, an online newspaper business that many consider to be the company that started it all.