Stories by John Gantz

E-marketplaces are down, but not for long

What I like about the dot-com stock crash is the misconceptions it has brewed. For instance, there's notion that business-to-consumer e-commerce is dead (there will actually be tenfold growth in four years) or that brick-and-mortar companies will no longer invest in e-business (they'll actually spend 25 percent more on e-business technology this year).

Prepare for the mobile scramble

Anywhere, anytime, everywhere, all the time. That might as well be the mantra for the coming decade.
I'm talking about mobile access to your company's systems from phones, Palm units and, perhaps someday, automobiles and wearable computers.

What spending slowdown? It's full e-speed ahead

You may think that because of the current talk of capital spending slowdowns and the Internet stock crash, you may get some sort of breather in rolling out major e-business applications.

As computing eras change, so do skills

In 1964, IBM Corp. announced the IBM 360 family of computers, made possible by the invention of the transistor about eight years earlier. This was the first time computers of different sizes could use the same operating system.

How to Win in the Battle for IT Talent

If you don't think the hallmark of a well-run IT department is its ability to hire good people, take a tip from the major IT services firms like IBM Corp., EDS and Andersen Consulting Inc. These companies spend about half of their marketing budgets to support recruiting. Apparently they have less trouble finding projects than people to do the work.

To keep your best IT people, keep them learning

Whenever I talk about the shortage of information technology professionals, the most common question I get in response - besides "Where do I find good people?" - is "How do I keep good people?"

E-Business Skills Shortage will Eclipse IT Gap

We all know about the current shortage of IT professionals. International Data Corp.'s Michael Boyd calculates that this year, there will be a demand for 4.5 million IT professionals in the U.S. vs. a supply of 4.1 million.

Guest column: Big Iron dilemma: We still need more

Those of you who read my column regularly know that I believe in a resurgence of the need for big iron, or servers of mainframes and storage systems that fill rooms. The growth of mission-critical Internet applications - which must scale to support thousands of users a day or even your smallest customers and must check every order in the supply chain - almost assures this. And the emergence of the application service provider (ASP) market is further proof.

Big Iron Dilemma: We Still Need More

Those of you who read my column regularly know that Ibelieve in a resurgence of the need for big iron, or servers of mainframes and storage systems that fill rooms. The growth of mission-critical Internet applications - which must scale to support thousands of users a day or even your smallest customers and must check every order in the supply chain - almost assures this. And the emergence of the application service provider (ASP) market is further proof.

Digital Markets Have Arrived, So Buckle Up!

I've been racking my brain trying to find a word or phrase to describe what the new digital marketplaces will do to information technology departments. I keep coming up with movie titles about asteroids about to hit Earth. Armageddon. Deep Impact. Take your pick.

Capacity Planning - an Obsolete Notion

There used to be rules and algorithms for sizing systems, storage, and memory. Capacity planning programs would take input on the number of users, expected file transfers, load statistics, and growth estimates, and spit out disk and CPU sizes you'd need.
Forget it. All that stuff is obsolete. In the "E" age, none of this applies.

Some May Need to Revisit Enterprise Apps Strategy

This will be a big year for enterprise applications - you know, enterprise resource planning (ERP), supply-chain management (SCM), customer relationship management (CRM) and so on. The Y2k financial drain is over, and e-business is in.

Controlling the Coming Chaos of Intranets

I was just digging through the data from International Data Corp.'s annual survey of technology adoption and found a mind-boggling statistic on intranet adoption that should set off alarm bells in the IT community.

Capacity Planning an Obsolete Notion

There used to be rules and algorithms for sizing systems, storage and memory. Capacity-planning programs would take input on the number of users, expected file transfers, load statistics and growth estimates, then spit out the disk and CPU sizes you'd need.

Market Place