Stories by Tommy Peterson

Making the most of IT

Most companies need to figure out how they can more effectively exploit the technologies they already have in place, rather than what new IT systems they need, according to Stephane Gagnon, who specializes in the management of IT and teaches in both the management and computer science departments at the Universite du Quebec and the New Jersey Institute of Technology. In a recent interview with Computerworld's Tommy Peterson, Professor Gagnon discussed IT-business alignment and related topics

Making the most of IT

Most companies need to figure out how they can more effectively exploit the technologies they already have in place, rather than what new IT systems they need, according to Stephane Gagnon, a professor at the Universite du Quebec and the New Jersey Institute of Technology. Gagnon specializes in the management of IT and teaches in both the management and computer science departments at the two universities. In a recent interview with Computerworld's Tommy Peterson, Gagnon discussed IT-business alignment and related topics.

Make your list, check it twice

As the year draws to a close, we find ourselves surrounded by the festive traditions of the season. Jolly old elves and prancing reindeer have been trucked in and deposited on the manicured lawns of corporate headquarters and bask in the glow of the lights proclaiming “Season’s Greetings” to passing motorists. Miniature trees and plastic candles twinkle cheerfully in corners of offices and cubicles. There are way too many sweets everywhere.

Send in the exterminators

Bugs. The nickname for software defects makes them sound like a natural phenomenon, even kind of cute and relatively harmless.

Services Provisioning Markup Language

Services Provisioning Markup Language is an XML-based framework for exchanging user, resource and service provisioning information between applications and organizations.

Who am I this time in virtual world?

My day at the office starts when I switch on my laptop and, responding to the system prompt, type the name of my Icelandic great-grandfather into the password field. As soon as Windows XP stops churning, I click on Lotus Notes and watch the hieroglyphics dance beside another password box as I type in the name of my favorite basketball coach. Having proved who I am to the satisfaction of our relatively low-security system, I can then get down to work.

Sharing the info wealth

Don Hatcher leads a team that shapes the strategic direction of SAS Institute's products and technologies. SAS's current initiatives focus in part on distributing analytics throughout its customers' organizations, rather than limiting access to the tools to a few highly trained individuals, said Hatcher in an interview with Computerworld's Tommy Peterson. He also said the biggest barriers to a business-intelligence (BI) implementation don't always involve technology.

Getting real about real time

The almost deafening buzz these days around the "real-time enterprise" is drowning out important practical questions about what the term real time really means and the nature of real time's impact on business processes.

Opinion: Getting real about real time

The almost deafening buzz these days around the "real-time enterprise" is drowning out important practical questions about what the term real time really means and the nature of real time's impact on business processes.

Interview: Nothing but 'Net

Carol Ptak is in the thick of PeopleSoft's efforts to transform itself from, as she puts it, "that HR company that, oh, by the way, does some supply chain" to a major player in ERP and analytics software. Ptak learned manufacturing from the ground up, starting out as an assembler on a plant floor.

Interview: Making the connection

Chief Technology Officer Deepak Taneja is in charge of technology strategy and initiatives at Waltham, Mass.-based Netegrity Inc., a leader in the burgeoning identity and access management market. He recently spoke with Tommy Peterson about how the Web has changed the notions of identity and access control in corporate computing, as well as the definition of an application. Taneja also described how Netegrity's technical focus is shifting to match those transformations.

Opinion: Catch the wireless wave

January, our month of resolutions, is almost over. The saturated fats and simple carbs are creeping back into our diets, while the frequency of trips to the gym is trending downward. A half-day search for my notes for this column suggests to me that my resolve to get organized is falling a bit short of the mark. As a metaphor for the economic climate, this season of disappointment is a little too close for comfort. In it, only the tough and the focused keep their heads up high enough to see over the wall of the bunker most of us have hunkered down into.

Technology Product Focus: How to tell your NAS from your elbow

Many IT and network managers are grappling with whether to choose relatively inexpensive, easy-to-implement network-attached storage (NAS) or storage-area networks (SAN), which are potentially more powerful but also more expensive and harder to implement.
Managers tend to go with NAS if they have tight budgets, need to bring more storage online quickly and work at companies leery of fast-changing technology. Enter network-attached storage (NAS) devices: Low-end, self-contained appliances that don't need keyboards, monitors or much else besides an Ethernet connection and AC power jacks to deliver gigabytes of disk space to your workgroup or remote office.