Stories by Ian Paul

4GB iPhone coming next week?

Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference is just under a week away, and there are more indications that Apple will unveil the next generation of its iPhone device. Rumors out late yesterday point to a 4GB iPhone model that could be an actual US$99 iPhone, and the possibility of four different versions of Apple's fabled wonder machine.

Next-gen HDMI turns your TV into an Internet hub

The next generation of High-Definition Multimedia Interface (HDMI) cables are going to give your HDTV a boost with a maximum 100Mb-per-second Internet connection, audio upstream capability and HD images at four times the resolution of 1080p.

Sony Ericsson unveils PS3-compatible mobile phone

It's not the PSP phone, but it's close. Sony Ericsson yesterday unveiled three new mobile phones including Aino, a cell phone that can sync with both your PlayStation 3 and PC. Aino also features an 8.1-megapixel camera with geotagging capability; 3G, Bluetooth and Wi-Fi connectivity; a physical keypad; and a three-inch touchscreen.

5 things I want to know about Bing

Microsoft's Steve Ballmer is expected to take the stage Thursday at the D: All Things D conference and debut Redmond's new search brand, codenamed Kumo.

32GB iPhone looking more likely

New iPhone rumors out Tuesday come very close to confirming the existence of a 32GB iPhone, and even resurrect the possibility of a US$99 iPhone from Apple.

Palm, iPhone battle in price war

Are you a Sprint customer thinking of upgrading to the Palm Pre, but you're not eligible for a free or subsidized device upgrade? Better start saving your pennies, because an out-of-contract Pre is going to run you $550, according to Engadget.

Alleged Blackberry Storm 2 photos surface

Photos alleging to be the Blackberry Storm 2 surfaced online Thursday to the site Crackberry. While the images are new, there is not a lot to get excited about. The supposed images of the next-gen Storm appear to reduce any high-hopes of what the actual Storm 2 might deliver.

Twitter replies are back, with a catch

Twitter has yielded to user outrage and reinstated its @reply feature. On Tuesday, Tweeps (Twitter people) around the world were angered when Twitter yanked the opt-in feature that allowed you to see Twitter replies that were sent from people you follow to people you don't. Now, it's back--but in a revised form.

Amazon puts any blog on the Kindle, for a price

Amazon Wednesday introduced Kindle Publishing for Blogs Beta, a new program that lets anyone sell blog subscriptions to Kindle users through Amazon's Kindle store. All you have to do is sign up for a blog vendor account (your Amazon customer account will not work), point Amazon to your blog's RSS feed, and fill out some basic information about your publication. After that, Amazon takes care of the rest, including formatting, and your blog should be in the Kindle Store within 12-48 hours.

Watching the Watchmen on Facebook

The Watchmen Director's Cut is coming to Blu-ray in late July and will include a feature that allows you to sync your BD-Live buddies and Facebook friends into one list. This means you can use Warner Home Video's live community screening feature (LCS) to simultaneously view the Watchmen with your Facebook friends, no matter where they are located and share comments about the movie within Facebook, according toThe Hollywood Reporter. The catch is everyone who wants to participate in LCS has to own a copy of the Blu-ray disc and have a BD-Live-enabled player with a broadband connection.

Apple orders developers to comply with iPhone OS 3.0

Apple yesterday warned iPhone application developers that all apps submitted for iTunes App Store approval must be compliant with iPhone OS 3.0. In an e-mail sent to registered iPhone developers, Apple said all new apps will be tested for approval on the latest beta version of 3.0. Cupertino said it may also remove any apps currently in the App Store if they do not work on the iPhone's new operating system.

Google Street View faces more privacy critics

Google is running into problems with privacy advocates in Japan and Greece over its Google Maps feature, Street View. Google plans to re-shoot Street View photographs in the twelve Japanese cities currently available in Street View after privacy complaints. At issue was the fact that Google's Street View cameras were mounted so high they were shooting over private fences and into Japanese homes. Google says it will lower its cameras by 16 inches for its re-shoot and for all future Street View photographs in Japan. Street View cameras are mounted on cars and take photographs with 360-degree views of the surrounding area.