Stories by Ryan Faas

Spaces: Apple's take on virtual desktops

Although Apple has been mum on many of the details of Leopard, CEO Steve Jobs did preview some of the coming attractions back in August. This month, I'm looking at another of those new features in Leopard that has gotten a lot of attention -- and engendered a fair amount of informed speculation -- among Mac fans: Spaces.

Apple's Time Machine: Forward into the past?

One of the most talked about features in Apple Computer's upcoming operating system, Mac OS X 10.5, also known as Leopard, is the built-in backup tool called Time Machine. For Mac users, Time Machine is big news: It marks the first time Apple has bundled any sort of backup solution with its operating system. (While it's true that Apple's .Mac service includes a basic consumer backup tool, the service is available only to subscribers of .Mac -- at a cost of US$99 per year.)

Why IT staff, users will like Apple's plans

Apple Computer CEO Steve Jobs opened Apple's annual Worldwide Developers Conference this week with a keynote that put an end to weeks of speculation about new products and features in the next generation of Mac OS X. The announcements Jobs made can be broken down into four major areas: information about Apple, the new Mac Pro, the new Intel-based Xserve and a preview of Mac OS X Leopard, which is due out by next spring.

Why IT staff, users will like Apple's plans

Apple Computer CEO Steve Jobs opened Apple's annual Worldwide Developers Conference yesterday with a keynote that put an end to weeks of speculation about new products and features in the next generation of Mac OS X. The announcements Jobs made can be broken down into four major areas: information about Apple, the new Mac Pro, the new Intel-based Xserve and a preview of Mac OS X Leopard, which is due out by next spring.

Boot Camp could boost Apple in education arena

Apple's Boot Camp could be a boon to the company's presence in the education market. Once the almost exclusive domain of Apple and the Mac, technology in education has been steadily shifting towards Windows-based PCs for several years -- particularly in colleges and at the high school level of K-12 education.