Stories by David Foote

IT pay is still crazy after all these years

A funny thing happened to IT organizations 20 years ago: They started leaking people. The business units began attracting a migration of workers with tech smarts, business savvy, "soft" skills and a grasp of what customers wanted and how to deliver it to them.

Building confidence in tough times

A few years of downsizing, belt-tightening and fanatical attention to ROI have tested IT professionals' patience and confidence. Many have been through tough economic times before, and they're coping reasonably well. But they're not dealing as well with fears of terrorism and concern about the Iraq war.

Seeding Your IT Staff

We're hearing the words economic recovery a lot now. It could be optimism fueled by upbeat economic indicators, or the enthusiasm of spring after the end of a restless winter. Still, real job growth traditionally trails economic growth, and economists are pointedly refusing to predict when profits might cascade into corporate budgets and allow IT to resume hiring in earnest.
That will happen eventually, but as any good gardener will tell you, preparing for the harvest begins long before the seeds are planted.

Seeding your IT ataff

We're hearing the words economic recovery a lot now. It could be optimism fueled by upbeat economic indicators, or the enthusiasm of spring after the end of a restless winter. Still, real job growth traditionally trails economic growth, and economists are pointedly refusing to predict when profits might cascade into corporate budgets and allow IT to resume hiring in earnest.

IT professionals rake in bucks despite downturn

Given the slowing economy and gloomy job climate, you might think IT workers are getting hit hard in their paychecks. But the fact is that IT professionals (at least those who still have jobs) are doing remarkably well.

Wanna Keep Your Staff Happy? Think 'Career'

It's right there in the latest employee surveys: Workers want opportunities for growth and advancement. Sure, they'd like to make more money, but when they're up against the decision to stay with their current employers or fly the coop, career progression beats cold, hard cash hands down.

Managing IT Workers Takes a Balancing Act

I thought I'd be taking the ultimate "gut course" when I signed up for something called "Ecology" in high school. A little light reading and a field trip every third class to an outdoor location for a pleasant stroll to observe nature's miracles up close - I figured I'd forget most of it quickly and end up with a great tan.

'Soft Stuff Need Not Be Hard to Give to IT Workers

My company interviews thousands of IT workers annually, collecting data about their salaries, bonuses and skills. But IT workers can be a talkative bunch. We can count on hearing a lot about what they like and dislike about their work, their employers and their peers. It's pretty straightforward, intriguing stuff.

Guest column: Consulting skills to help tech pros survive

Thirty years ago, when the late artist Andy Warhol said, "In the future, everyone will be famous for 15 minutes," we all laughed at the statement's absurdity. But then came Jerry Springer and trash TV, tabloid journalism and now the Internet, where anyone can post his life story on a personal Web page for the world to view. In this spirit, I'd like to introduce "Foote's Maxim": In the future, every IT worker will be a consultant for 15 minutes.

Consulting Skills to Help Tech Pros Survive

Thirty years ago, when the late artist Andy Warhol said, "In the future, everyone will be famous for 15 minutes," we all laughed at the statement's absurdity. But then came Jerry Springer and trash TV, tabloid journalism and now the Internet, where anyone can post his life story on a personal Web page for the world to view. In this spirit, I'd like to introduce "Foote's Maxim": In the future, every IT worker will be a consultant for 15 minutes.

Some Preventive Medicine for Cases of Dot-com-itis

Depending on whom you ask, it's either a personality disorder, a temporary condition, or perfectly normal behavior. It's called dot-com-itis, a persistent and seemingly pervasive preoccupation with Internet company employment. Is it simply human nature in entrepreneurs' clothing? It certainly says a lot about who we are and what we want; but even more, it's showing us how much we stand to lose in embracing this brave new Webified world.