Stories by Elizabeth Wasserman

Supreme Decision Marks a Microsoft Victory

Microsoft won an initial victory Tuesday when the U.S. Supreme Court decided not to hear an expedited appeal of a court-ordered breakup of the software giant. The justices ruled that the case should first go to a lower appellate court.

The Other Trustbuster

If America Online Inc. (AOL) and Time Warner Inc. want to merge, they'll have to get through Richard Parker first.

The New Masters of Domains

Kenneth harvey never intended to confuse shoppers when he registered the domain name Walmartcanadasucks.com. The 38-year-old writer from Newfoundland says he just wanted to get under Wal-Mart's skin. After all, Wal-Mart had already convinced an international arbitrator to strip him of the Walmartcanada.com domain, without compensating him for the $70 registration fee.

Clinton Approves NTT-Verio Deal

The White House announced Wednesday that President Clinton will allow Japan's Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corp. to purchase the U.S. Web hosting company Verio Inc., which had undergone an unusual high-level review due to espionage concerns.

Judge: Microsoft Broke Antitrust Law

In a stingingly worded decision, a U.S. federal judge found today that Microsoft Corp. violated antitrust laws by maintaining monopoly power in the operating system software market "by anticompetitive means," attempting to monopolize the Web browser market and illegally tying its Internet Explorer browser to the Windows operating system.

E-Commerce Panel Goes Home Empty-Handed

Not even 20 hours of back-room negotiations, artful parliamentary maneuvering and a firm deadline Tuesday could help members of a hopelessly divided congressional tax panel broker an agreement to clarify rules for collecting sales taxes on purchases via the Internet.

Mitnick Serves as a Warning for Security Systems

Reformed computer hacker Kevin Mitnick, donning a blue suit and tie but legally barred from carrying a cell phone or PalmPilot anywhere, told Congress Thursday that the U.S. government and private companies need to beef up security to prevent curiosity-seekers like him from breaking in.

Mitnick Schools Feds on Hacking 101

Reformed computer hacker Kevin Mitnick, donning a blue suit and tie but legally barred from carrying a cell phone or PalmPilot anywhere, told U.S. Congress today that the U.S. government and private companies need to beef up security to prevent curiosity-seekers like him from breaking in.

Briefs: Dot-Govs in the Primaries

HERE'S LOOKIN' AT YOUR SITE: The most frequent visitor to political Web sites just before the New Hampshire primary wasn't a voter. Or even a person. Busy cruising the campaign sites were computers owned by Keynote Systems, a Silicon Valley company that regards itself as "the J.D. Power of the Internet."

Lessig Urges Judge to Get Into the Code

Harvard University law school professor Lawrence Lessig urged the federal judge presiding over the antitrust case against Microsoft Tuesday to delve into the intricacies of software design to determine whether the company illegally tied its Internet browser to the market-dominant Windows operating system, despite an appellate court ruling.

Vote for Me.com

The door bursts open to the one-man war room of the Web site headquarters for Republican presidential candidate John McCain. A towering figure appears.

From Smoke-Filled Rooms to Silicon Valley

Politicians don't retire. these days, they join Internet firms. Former officeholders have traditionally moved on to the greener pastures of lobbying and sitting on corporate boards. But the flow of political bigwigs from the Beltway to the Valley - call them the dot-pols - is becoming a familiar story.

GOP Front-Runners Spar Over Netco Ad Taxes

High-tech supporters of GOP presidential hopeful George W. Bush Thursday went on the offense against rival Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., criticizing a provision of his tax bill that would reduce corporate tax breaks for advertising as "the first substantial tax increase on the Internet."

Wooing the Web Vote

In income-tax-free New Hampshire, Republican presidential candidate John McCain recently began airing campaign ads that tout his support for extending the Internet tax moratorium. In conservative South Carolina, he's running ads trumpeting his work to protect children from online pornography. The Arizona senator is betting that those issues - Internet issues - will resonate with voters.