Stories by Peter G.W. Keen

Embracing the PDA

The PC began in the late 1970s as a stand-alone device that was literally "personal". Initially, many corporate information systems departments resisted it for three main reasons: First, it was a toy for hobbyists and not a real computer. Second, it intruded on their control of most aspects of IT decisions, and third, it threatened the integrity of the company's technology base in terms of security, standards, support needs and operations. Yet people loved PCs and were going to use them regardless of what IT thought.

Consultant, anyone?

Some of the best companies I work with are consulting firms. And some are the worst, too. How does IT pick the best?

Guest column: The 'Déjà Vu' Effect

We've seen the internet before. Yes, it's new in terms of technology, but it's not in terms of business. It's the most rapid and extreme form of deregulation ever, and we know a lot about the dynamics of deregulation. The great shakeout in e-tailing is following the pattern of airline deregulation, and business-to-business e-commerce looks very much like it's doing the same.

The 'Déjà Vu' Effect

We've seen the Internet before. Yes, it's new in terms of technology, but it's not in terms of business. It's the most rapid and extreme form of deregulation ever, and we know a lot about the dynamics of deregulation. The great shakeout in e-retailing is following the pattern of airline deregulation, and business-to-business e-commerce looks very much like it's doing the same.

Guest column: Six Months -- or Else

Well, it has finally happened. Large-scale software is being delivered on time and under budget. More important, a development project now sets 90 days for the key first deliverable and no more than six months for full implementation, and there's no time wasted prototyping - you go straight into full design.

Six Months -- or Else

Well, it has finally happened. Large-scale software is being delivered on time and under budget. More important, a development project now sets 90 days for the key first deliverable and no more than six months for full implementation, and there's no time wasted prototyping - you go straight into full design.

Ensuring E-trust

There's only one thing that can slow down the Internet and e-commerce growth surge: a loss of confidence among customers about the protection of their privacy and the security of systems. To date, there have been surprisingly few safety problems with online business.

IT's Value in the Chain

Internet-based logistics has transformed the economics of business more than any other factor in the past decade. Therefore, it should be a priority for IT to make a major contribution to business by showing how a company can boost profits through technology.

Ready for IT-Plus?

Two days before Christmas, USA Today ran a story on the front of its Money section detailing the problems behind returning gifts bought over the Web. Pay attention, IT -- please. The e-commerce story and its prominence are noteworthy. It's yet another reminder that technology is now at the very center of business, not at its periphery. We've never seen as much coverage of IT as in the past few months -- Y2K, of course, as well as e-commerce, technology stocks and IPOs.

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