Briefs

The startup formed by Oracle Corp. CEO Larry Ellison to get $199 Internet-access devices into schools has a new target. Gina Smith, CEO of The New Internet Computer Co. (NICC) in San Francisco, last week said the company will "absolutely" target the corporate market. A corporate version of NICC's Linux-based device is expected before year's end, and it will be distinguished from the education and consumer versions by the software on the CD-ROM that accompanies it, Smith said.

Intel Corp. last week said it will replace approximately 1 million PC motherboards designed around its 820 chip set because of a faulty component that could cause system failures and, under extreme conditions, data corruption. Motherboards shipped since November may have the defect. Systems shipped before then aren't affected, Intel said.

Lucent Technologies Inc. last week announced a venture that will produce integrated semiconductor modules for use in next-generation wireless devices such as cellular phones and personal digital assistants. Lucent said it has developed a way to integrate memory, logic and other complex analog and digital circuits onto a single silicon chip. The first application planned by the Murray Hill, New Jersey, company will be in the radios that are at the heart of wireless devices.

Short Takes

Hewlett-Packard Co. recently launched a line of entry-level Unix servers, part of the vendor's broader effort to earn a bigger slice of the estimated $10.8 billion worldwide market for such systems. ... Japan's NTT Communications announced an agreement to acquire Web-hosting and Internet services provider Verio Inc. for about $5.5 billion in cash.

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