Word Processing

SAN FRANCISCO (01/31/2000) - Sometimes you need to say something striking in a document to get the reader's attention. Why not dictate a voice comment directly into what you are writing, so the reader will really prick up their ears? It's easy to do, as long as you have a microphone connected to your PC.

Just remember to use voice comments sparingly, because sound objects can be quite large and will significantly increase the file size. For example, a 3.5- second voice comment will add about 75KB.

Word 97 and 2000: Start by positioning the cursor where you want the voice attachment to appear, then select Insert*Object. Go to the Create New tab in the Object dialog, select Wave Sound from the Object Type list, and click OK.

When the Sound Object dialog box appears, click the red Record button and speak. When you're finished recording, click the Stop button. Then select File*Exit and Return to Document. At this point, you'll see a speaker icon for the sound attachment in the text at your curser position.

To play the sound, just double-click the speaker icon in the document. If you want to edit the sound or record over it entirely, right-click the speaker icon, select Wave Sound Object*Edit, then click the red Record button and make your changes.

WordPerfect 8 and 9: While WordPerfect offers an Insert*Sound command, there's an easier way to record a new .wav sound: First, position the cursor where you want your comment to appear in the text, then select Insert*Object. Next, select Create New in the Object dia-log box, and se-lect Wave Sound from the Object Type list. Then click OK. When the Sound Object dialog box appears, simply click the Record button and step up to the mike. Click the Stop button when you're finished recording. Then select File*Exit and Return to Document. A speaker icon will appear at the insertion point.

To play the sound, just double-click on the speaker icon, then click the Play button in the Sound Object dialog box. Close the dialog box when you're finished. If you want to edit or record over the sound entirely, right-click the speaker icon, then select Wave Sound Object*Edit, and repeat the recording process.

Note that in both Word and WordPerfect, the technique described above saves the .wav sound data in the document itself, making it truly portable.

The Lowdown on Highlighting

Whether you want to call attention to a point in your document or tag sections of it for your own access, highlighting is an easy way to make your mark without altering the text. For many people, though, highlighting remains a mystery. Here are some tips to help end the confusion.

Word 95 through 2000:

* To highlight text, click the arrow next to the highlighting icon (the pencil with the color bar underneath it) on the formatting toolbar, and choose a highlighting color. When you've chosen a color, your mouse pointer will turn into a felt pen symbol. Click and drag the felt pen over the text you'd like to highlight, then release the mouse button.

* To highlight a specific block of text quickly, use these shortcuts (instead of dragging the mouse pointer over the text): To highlight a word, double-click that word; for a sentence, -click anywhere in the sentence; and for a paragraph, triple-click inside the paragraph.

* When you want to turn off the highlighting mouse pointer, click the highlighting icon once more, or press .

* To remove highlighting from text, reselect the text using the highlighting mouse pointer. Or use the shortcuts described above to remove it in a single step.

WordPerfect 8 and 9:

* To highlight text, click the arrow next to the highlighting icon on the formatting toolbar and choose a color. Then click the icon itself. The mouse pointer will turn into a felt pen symbol; click and drag the felt pen over the text to highlight it.

* To highlight a specific block of text quickly, use these shortcuts instead of dragging: To highlight a word, double-click that word; to highlight a sentence, triple-click inside the sentence; to highlight a paragraph, double-click in the left margin next to the paragraph, or quadruple-click inside the paragraph itself.

* To turn off the highlighting mouse pointer, click the highlighting icon again.

* To remove highlighting from text, reselect the text using the highlighting mouse pointer, delete the Highlight codes in the Reveal Codes window, or simply repeat the shortcuts described above.

Make 'Save As' the Default

Since I often create new documents based on older ones, I sometimes run into a problem with saving. Several times I have accidentally overwritten the old document by selecting Save instead of Save As. Is there some way in Word to make Save As the default?

Julia I. Miller, Long Beach, California

There's no direct way to do this, but you can eliminate the Save command under the File menu, which would have the same effect. This works in all versions of Word, from 97 through 2000. Select Tools*Customize, and a dialog box will open.

You don't need to do anything in this box, but once it's open, you'll have the power to customize your menus. Now open the File menu, click the Save command, drag the command off the menu, and drop it on the document window. This will remove it from the File menu. If you really want to be sure that you won't accidentally save a file, you can also click and drag the Save icon off of the Standard toolbar (while the Tools*Customize dialog box is open). Any time you need to simply save a file, press -S. The File Menu, though, will only offer the Save As command. You can also press , which is Word's default "Save as" key.

If sometime later you want to restore the Save command to the File menu, select Tools*Customize, and click the Commands tab. Then open the File menu, select Save from the list of commands in the dialog box and drag the Save command back onto the File menu.

Create Side-by-side Bulleted Lists

I need to create two parallel bulleted lists, side-by-side on the page, but I can't find a way to do this in Word or WordPerfect. I'm sure there must be a way, but I can't find a solution in the programs' Help menus. Can you help?

William Meyer, Lincoln Park, New Jersey

Sure. This common need is easy to fill but takes a little creative thinking about using tables to arrange text on the page. Although it's almost impossible to align text reliably in columns, tables are great at creating these kinds of parallel text arrangements. Here are the basic steps required.

Word 95 through 2000: Position the cursor where you'd like the parallel lists to begin. Select Table*Insert Table, and in the Insert Table dialog box, set the Number of columns to 2 and the Number of rows to 1. Click OK.

Next, click inside the left column, and click the Bulleted List icon in the main toolbar. Type the left list, or cut and paste an existing list into the cell. Repeat this process to create the right column.

To make the table gridlines invisible when printing, right-click in the table, then select Borders and Shading from the context menu. Select None in the Borders and Shading dialog box, then click OK. Although the borders and gridlines will appear light gray on your screen, the lines will not show up on your printout.

Note that Word allows you to adjust the width and position of the table's columns simply by clicking and dragging them from within the document.

WordPerfect 8 and 9: Start by positioning the cursor where you want the parallel lists to appear, then select Insert*Table. Next, in the Create Table dialog box, set the Columns to 2 and the Rows to 1, and click Create. Click inside the left column, and then click the Bulleted List icon on the main toolbar. Type the left list, or paste in an existing list. Then repeat this process to create the right-hand column.

If you want to make the table borders and gridlines disappear in the printout of your document, right-click in the table, then select SpeedFormat from the context menu. In the Table SpeedFormat dialog, select No Lines No Border from the Available Styles list, then click Apply and Close.

Note that you can adjust the width and position of the table's columns by clicking and dragging them inside the document.

Send word processing questions and tips to george_campbell@pcworld.com. We pay $50 for published items. George Campbell is a PC World contributing editor.

Visit his Web page at www.osomin.com.

Display Full Menus in Word 2000

Word 2000's New personalized menus can be too smart for your own good. It's frustrating to select a main menu then not find the command you want. You can wait a few seconds for the full menu to appear, or click the expansion arrow, but who wants the hassle? An undocumented work-around: Double-click any main or submenu command to display the entire menu. For permanent fix, select Tools*Customize, then click the Options tab. Clear the Menus Show recently used commands checkbox, then click Close.

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