doctrieve on deal doorstep

Signalling its drive into services, storage and risk management software developer doctrieve has answered the call of financial company OAMPS Insurance Brokers to guard its data.

Under the agreement, OAMPS will store its critical data on doctrieve's remote system, as well as marketing doctrieve's services to its own business clients as a "value-add" for the security of their data.

The alliance enables the Queensland-based developer to begin laying the foundations for its sureVault product, an off-site data storage service which will see doctrieve move headlong into the next frontier of the storage market as a storage service provider (SSP).

Using sureVault, data can be accessed via any Internet connection and all data is compressed and encrypted during its transmission and storage, ensuring it is unreadable to anyone, including sureVault staff, the company claimed.

Not many IT companies, be it channel or otherwise, are currently geared to operate as SSPs, although the market has been recognised by analysts as having potential. In a recent interview with ARN (September 27, page 47), Graham Penn, International Data Corp's director of storage research, Asia-Pacific, said the model will gain greater acceptance over time, as trust between an enterprise and its third-party SSP increases.

In this alliance, doctrieve is capitalising on a heavily paper-driven industry to streamline operating expenses for OAMPS by storing its (largely paper) documents electronically. According to OAMPS director Charles Green, the alliance will also let the company build a better database and provide an audit trail for all of its information.

OAMPS has been on an acquisitions rampage, picking up seven regional insurance brokers across the country, and doctrieve's products will be rolled out to all OAMPS' branches over the next six months. doctrieve managing director Earl Woolley said the alliance recognises the high level of trust doctrieve has established with OAMPS since it first started using doctrieve products in 1992. According to Woolley, doctrieve has been at the "forefront" of data vaulting or third-party data management for a number of years but is only starting to realise its efforts of late.

"This data vaulting thing could be bigger than Ben Hur, but you have to work at it," said Woolley. "It's taken seven years for enterprises to accept [data-vaulting], but they are starting to now."www.doctrieve.com

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