IBM Helps WebSphere Go Wireless

IBM announced Tuesday a more wireless- friendly version of its WebSphere software at the CTIA (Cellular Telecommunications Industry Association) held here.

IBM developed the WebSphere software to run and help develop e-business applications, including anything from Web publishing to large-scale business-transaction processes. The WebSphere software attempts to link and simplify communication between hardware and software throughout the numerous applications that large companies use. Big Blue said Monday the WebSphere platform will now be able to translate Internet content into a form readable by a number of handheld devices, including some cell phones and PDAs (personal digital assistants).

The WebSphere Transcoding Publisher version 3.5 will extend its current HTML support (HyperText Markup Language) by including language translators for HDML (Handheld Device Markup Language) and iMode protocol. The software extensions will also help the conversion of JPG and GIF image formats into a wireless bitmap format that could make wireless picture delivery more available to users.

IBM also added what it calls extended deck fragmentation capabilities. The company said these tools can break Web pages into smaller pieces when the system detects a device may have limited memory, according to a statement.

The Java-based architecture of the WebSphere Transcoding Publisher helps the software convert data from standard languages such as XML or HTML to the wireless formats now becoming more prevalent. IBM said the software runs on Linux, Sun Microsystems Inc.'s Solaris and Microsoft Corp.'s Windows NT and Windows 2000 operating systems.

Version 3.5 should be available across the globe in 10 languages starting Nov. 24. IBM said it starts at US$30,000 per processor.

IBM, in Armonk, New York, can be reached at http://www.ibm.com/.

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