Public Cloud is not for everybody: Brocade

Networking vendor expects the benefits of the Cloud to remain appealing to numerous organisations

Despite all of the market hype, Brocade does not expect the public Cloud to appeal to every organisation.

A/NZ systems engineer manager, Phill Coates, points to challenges such as data sovereignty or the need to have access to the physical infrastructure.

“Production data is typically housed locally to reduce latency and access times, but backed up data is not always stored on Australian shores,” he said.

“This could mean an alternative country’s laws can be used to gain access to your data.”

Backing up is typically seen as a streamlined operation, though Coates said with the Cloud you may need to consider where the data resides for the backup, what the bandwidth to recover is, and how long a recovery will take.

Provider’s responsibility

Despite the challenges, Coates said there are numerous benefits with the public Cloud that makes it attractive to businesses.

In particular, not having to build your own datacentre and worrying about the real estate, the power and cooling, and the access to data services and plant security.

“We are seeing that pushing services to the Cloud provides more flexibility and agility than typically is seen by owing and having to upgrade your own equipment,” he said.

Coates adds hardware can keep current and is rented through the Cloud arrangement, and upgrades are also carried out by the provider.

Patrick Budmar covers consumer and enterprise technology breaking news for IDG Communications. Follow Patrick on Twitter at @patrick_budmar.

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