Entrust answers Microsoft users' security needs

Entrust Technologies Inc. this week will ship upgraded digital certificate management software that aims to address network security concerns of Microsoft Corp. customers.

The software, Entrust 6.0, has been redesigned so the company's digital certificates can be used with Microsoft's Internet Explorer browser and Outlook e-mail without the need for an Entrust software plug-in to digitally sign and encrypt Web forms and messages.

However, for the Netscape browser, Lotus Notes and other client software, users still need the Entrust plug-in.

Entrust 6.0 also includes the Entrust Authority Security Manager 6.0, available as Windows NT or Unix server software, for issuing and revoking certificates, which bind a user's identity to a public-private key pair for signing, encrypting and authenticating documents electronically. It's possible now to store Entrust digital certificates in Microsoft Active Directory in addition to a standard Lightweight Directory Access Protocol-based repository.

Customers voiced their desire to have Entrust and Microsoft products work better together at a forum co-sponsored by the vendors last summer.

Entrust has exploited the CryptoAPIs in Windows 2000 to integrate its security offerings with Microsoft's products. Baltimore Technologies beat Entrust to the punch earlier this year by integrating its certificate authority product with Win 2000 and Active Directory.

Entrust 6.0 includes new features that are not Microsoft-specific. The software now can work with products from Tumbleweed and Content Technologies that enable e-mail or documents encrypted with the user's Entrust certificates to be scanned for approval based on their content. Entrust 6.0 can also be used with Citrix servers, which support the use of thin clients.

Entrust Authority Security Manager 6.0 costs US$25,000, and certificates for e-mail or Web authentication for 10,000 users start at $27 per user.

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