NSW developed technology leads to 'oarsome' performance

Computerised oar analyses rowing data

A computerised oar that allows rowing coaches to scientifically analyse the performance of their rowing squads was unveiled at the World Rowing Championships in New Zealand recently.

The Arondight oar, named after Sir Lancelot’s sword, was developed in NSW by Brookvale company Talon Technology and Croker Oars.

Treasurer and Minister for State and Regional Development, Eric Roozendaal, said in a statement that the NSW Government assisted the project as part of its efforts to support the states growing digital economy.

The government’s Innovation Pathways Program provided $25,000 to Talon Technology to assist with the Arondight oars product testing and technology demonstration trials.

"Rowing is a very precise sport with races often won or lost by fractions of a second. This technology allows coaches to see exactly what happens when a rower takes a stroke by collecting quantifiable data that can be used to benchmark performance and measure improvements,” said Roozendaal.

Talon Technology CEO, Geoff Germon, said in a statement that the Arondight technology is enclosed in the rowing oar and can be moved from boat to boat.

“This gives it significant economies of scale and allows it to be made relatively cheaply. The reduced complexity of the product also significantly reduces set-up time making the Arondight oar more attractive to sports institutes, rowing clubs and schools,” he said.

Talon Technology specialises in carbon fibre design and manufacture including dragon boat oars. It developed the data gathering technology.

The Australian Institute of Sport is planning for some rowers in its rowing development squad to have their own personal Arondight oar to collect and analyse performance data during competition or practice.

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Tags New Zealandworld rowing championshipsTalon TechnologyArondight

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