SCO aims at enterprise users

SME traditionalist SCO is attempting to shift into the enterprise Unix space as the Intel-based servers have become more scalable.

Brad Scott, general manager Pacific region of SCO, said advances in Intel's server architecture had allowed SCO to move into the enterprise arena. Until recently, Scott explained, the largest Intel server available was four-way. Eight-way servers and non-stop clustering technology from Compaq have "raised the ceiling" SCO, he said.

"We've been quick to recognise the importance of the new Intel systems," Scott said. "The traditional SCO markets have filtered up [to the enterprise]."

He said up to 12 of Intel's 8-way servers could be used in a single cluster.

"We're replacing the traditional Unixes," Scott said. He says SCO's lower price point and low maintenance costs were compelling arguments for enterprises to adopt the Unix. Scott said SCO had recently signed a deal with one of the big four banks which will run its financial applications on SCO and Sun. "It was one-sixth the price of the major suppliers," Scott said.

SCO Unix is also the underlying operating system for Stadium Australia's point of sale system, said to be the largest system of its type.

Scott said SCO was now on a campaign of educating its resellers. He says they can make more money from selling SCO Unix than from selling NT, and its administration costs are also lower for a reseller.

Meanwhile, SCO and TurboLinux have announced a global services program that will provide TurboLinux customers with Linux Professional Consulting Services from SCO.

Scott said SCO's Professional Services organisation would support TurboLinux customers in the deployment of their Linux systems. Services should be available later this month.

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