NBN 3.0: What are you saying?

From the AAB's open letter to the lack of NBN details in the ALP's costings - what you've been saying this week about the state IT in Australia

Every week, Computerworld Australia collates all the things our readers have been saying about the news, both in the forums and in comments.

Here’s what you had to say on: Alliance for Affordable Broadband’s Open Letter and Computerworld Australia’s reply

“Wireless? No thanks. Satellite? No thanks. Fibre to the node is the fastest and safest way to go. Private investment is not prepared to cover 98% of Australia so the government is obliged to fill the gap and provide this vital service. Did private investment build the railways or roads? Did private investment build the copper network? I can't wait a 100 years for that to happen. Who wrote this article and what are their interests?” – Said Wayne B on NBN 3.0 from the Alliance for Affordable Broadband: Open Letter

“Good reply to the lacklustre NBN3.0 AAB letter, all ideas floated about advancing Australian digital infrastructure leave me more and more convinced that the private sector ARE NOT the best way to secure the best result for the Australian public.

Waiting with a good deal of impatiance for the NBN.Co costings to be made public from the meeting the 3 indie's had today.” – said D Newman on NBN 3.0: Our reply to the Alliance for Affordable Broadband

Here’s what you had to say on: UNSW’s domain expiry that caused email and site outages

“Failure to renew the domain name typically takes 3 days to resolve. DNS updates will propagate around the world once the bill is paid/service is re-established. It's not quick. It's also rather random in how long it'll take to start working again.

If it went dead at midnight and you lost access at 10am, then it took about 10 hours for your ISP to notice that the DNS listing had changed (expiry). You can then expect that it'll take about 10 hours for your ISP to notice the next change (renewal/reactivation). It's not always the case, but it's a good rule of thumb.” – said Peter on Updated: Domain expiry downs UNSW sites, e-mail

Here’s what you had to say on: Vodafone Hutchison Australia’s increased data quotas

“Unfortunately the Vodafone coverage is appalling. Even in Sydney, in high-population areas, I find myself having to stand outside a house or a building in order to hold a call without dropouts. In Cremorne I had to stand in the rain to take an important call - no coverage inside a house. On the Gold Coast in a high-rise, an Optus 3G connection ran for 4 days with only one dropout, whereas my VF handset needed to be near the window or on the balcony to get a voice connection. And if voice can't hold a connection, 3G certainly cannot.

Vodafone's coverage is even a poor second to Optus. And anywhere outside large cities/towns, you are lucky to have VF coverage on the highway and very lucky to have any coverage a few Km either side of a major highway even if that highway has VF coverage. VF's model seems to be only to address the market via pricing and marketing. How about spending some more on infrastructure, instead of just acting as if that battle is lost?” – said VodafoneNeedMoreBases on VHA increases data quotas as users choose mobile internet

Here’s what you had to say on: The absence of the NBN in the ALP’s costings

“My oh my, how Labor lies..."Of course we want it to be made public" --- Gillard doesn't hold a very high opinion of Australian's mental faculties if she expects us to buy that line of manure. Where has the transparency been to date on any of this? Torpedo NBN 2.0, send Conroy back to whatever idiot thing he was doing before he fell into the communication minister role, and let the Real Julia go back to courting voters in Boganville, Vic instead of trying to hoodwink the entire nation.” – said Hutch on NBN missing from ALP costings

Here’s what you had to say on: The collaboration between Microsoft and Telstra for the Windows Phone 7

“It is fitting that Telstra and Microsoft jump into bed together, as both companies have difficulty predicting the technology future, and both companies see their long-held monopolies crumble. This comment from Telstra about Windows Phone 7 is ludicrous: "from an enterprise and a business perspective it’s a platform that goes all the way from consumer to enterprise". The comment is both silly and disingenuous.

I hate to be the one to burst Telstra's fantasy, but enterprise is not going to touch Windows Phone 7 in the foreseeable future. Enterprises make conservative IT decisions. Windows Phone 7 is unproven. Unfinished. Rushed to market, and full of shortcomings.

As for security, WP7 can't do IPsec security. It cannot recognise security settings on Office documents (that determine who can and can't read the documents). Do enterprises really want to edit Office documents from a phone, anyway?

Windows Phone 7 renders all WM6.5 apps obsolete (no backwards compatibility). Custom apps can't be loaded directly onto phones, but must be placed in Microsoft's store. Windows Phone 7 can't multitask, and most ridiculously, cannot Cut-And-Paste (how on earth can you move text from one app to another without C&P?)

Yet Telstra is telling everyone that this is the phone for enterprise. The reality is that Windows Phone 7 will be the platform most avoided by enterprise.” – said Tod Wendbridge on Microsoft banking on TelstraOne Hub for Windows Phone 7

Here’s what you had to say on: The Federal Court halting PS3 mod chip sales

“A temporary ban is one thing, but to require them to hand over stock to Sony or their solicitors is another. If the court wants to ensure existing stock is not sold or used in the interim they should take custody of them, themselves not have the property of one party handed over to another party during an ongoing case. It just doesn't seem right.” – said Deonast on Federal Court halts PS3 mod chip sales

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