YouTube, the ultimate crime fighting tool

Investigators received a tip from members of the public

YouTube has come to the aid of public do-gooders once again with news the well-known crime-fighting tool was used as evidence by investigators.

Snake-handler, David Dixon Jolly, 72, recently pleaded guilty to 62 charges, and was fined $7,500 for illegally releasing snakes after the public tipped off investigators on incriminating clips showing Jolly disregarding his wildlife permit.

Though required to release captured snakes into an appropriate habitat as close to their previous location as possible, it was found he kept the animals or gave them to a third party to release, ignoring the conditions of his permit.

The investigation took place after YouTube clips were discovered that showed Jolly and two associates capturing and releasing snakes.

"Registered wildlife handlers with licences to capture or rehabilitate injured wildlife have a fundamental responsibility to care for native wildlife in their care and to abide by the highest standards of their industry," Queensland acting climate change minister, Annastacia Palazczuk, said in a statement.

"There is simply no room for them to neglect or disregard the condition of their permits, as a high level of trust goes with authorising people to undertake these roles," she added.

Jolly was found to have 48 snakes in his possession at his residence on 5 February 2009. His offences consist of keeping snakes, such as carpet pythons, rough scaled snakes and whip snakes, in captivity without a permit and illegally purchasing three woma pythons which he didn’t have permits to keep.

Criminals beware, you never know who is watching.

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Tags onlineinvestigatorscrimesnakesfightingyoutube

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