VMware's SpringSource boosts cloud computing plans with acquisition

SpringSource, the enterprise Java vendor recently bought by VMware, announced an acquisition Tuesday that is designed to boost VMware’s cloud computing plans in the platform-as-a-service market.

SpringSource, the enterprise Java vendor recently bought by VMware, announced an acquisition Tuesday that is designed to boost VMware’s cloud computing plans in the platform-as-a-service market.

VMware has acquired Rabbit Technologies, maker of the RabbitMQ open source messaging platform for delivering messages between applications, databases, storage platforms, browsers, client devices and other types of systems.

While VMware is making the acquisition, it was announced by SpringSource because RabbitMQ will be integrated into the SpringSource platform.

The acquisition is a small one. Rabbit, based in London, England and founded in 2007, has just 10 employees, who will be relocated to the VMware development office in London. SpringSource did not disclose financial details of the purchase, but said the merger will help achieve the cloud computing goals laid out by VMware last year when it stuck a $362 million deal to purchase SpringSource.

VMware’s goal is to be the virtualization technology underlying platform-as-a-service offerings, a part of the cloud market that gives customers the tools to build Web applications and have them hosted remotely.

SpringSource fits into that goal because the company’s software helps developers build Java applications, and RabbitMQ’s open source messaging software, based on the AMQP standard, will help prevent customers from getting locked into a proprietary platform, the vendors say.

As applications move outside the enterprise firewall and into public cloud computing services, there is more communication required among various computing systems and software platforms, says SpringSource general manager Rod Johnson

“If you look at things that are important to provide in a platform-as-a-service, clearly messaging is one of those elements,” Johnson says. “We believe one of the key benefits companies will see in this platform is openness and portability. Users will not be locked into any specific service when they use that messaging technology.”

Messaging systems such as the one developed by Rabbit make it easier for “developers to create complex applications by decoupling the individual program components,” Rabbit says on its Web site. “Rather than communicating directly, the messaging infrastructure facilitates the exchange of data between components. The components need know nothing about each other’s status, availability or implementation, which allows them to be distributed over heterogeneous platforms and turned off and on as required.”

Messaging systems make it so developers don’t have to worry about the details of operating systems and network interfaces, and improve interoperability, scalability and flexibility of applications, the company further says.

Rabbit Technologies, which claims to offer a more reliable messaging system than competitors, with good throughput and latency, already had partnerships with VMware, Microsoft, Novell and several other vendors.

Join the newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.

Tags cloud computingVMwarevirtualisation

More about MicrosoftNovellVMware Australia

Show Comments
<img height="1" width="1" style="border-style:none;" alt="" src="//insight.adsrvr.org/track/evnt/?adv=bitgblf&ct=0:jkis3bum&fmt=3"/>