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Intel Processor-Based Systems Most Prominent On ‘Top500’ List

  • 18 November, 2003 11:16

<p>INTEL PROCESSOR-BASED SYSTEMS MOST PROMINENT ON ‘TOP500’ LIST</p>
<p>Intel Bolsters Future Industry Research With US$36 Million Advanced Computing Program</p>
<p>Sydney, Australia, 18 November 2003 - According to the 22nd Edition of the ‘TOP500’ list of the world’s fastest supercomputers released this week, Intel processors continue to gain acceptance with high-performance computing (HPC) solutions. Nearly 38 per cent of systems on the list use Intel processors, 15 per centage points more than the closest competing architecture and overtaking RISC-based systems for the first time.</p>
<p>The TOP500 project was started in 1993 to provide a reliable basis for tracking and detecting trends in high-performance computing. Twice a year, a list of the sites operating the 500 most powerful computer systems is assembled and released.</p>
<p>In other news, Intel Corporation at the Supercomputing 2003 Conference unveiled the Advanced Computing Program, dedicating US$36 million and additional engineering resources to bolster R&amp;D and investment in future HPC designs and solutions.</p>
<p>The list includes 189 systems based on Intel® Itanium® 2 or Intel® Xeon™ processors, a 58 per cent increase from just six months ago and more than triple the 56 systems listed in November 2002. Five of the top 15 systems use Intel processors and the number of Intel</p>
<p>Itanium 2-based systems increased to 32, up 68 per cent from 19 systems in June. Additional information is available at www.top500.org.</p>
<p>In a related announcement today, Intel and the University of California at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) disclosed that they will deploy a supercomputer in January that will use nearly 4,000 Intel Itanium 2 processors and is expected to be a top-ranked system included in the next list to be issued in June. More information on this announcement is available at www.intel.com/pressroom.</p>
<p>“We are ecstatic about the acceptance of Intel’s standards-based approach to meet the needs of the most demanding applications in the world,” said Mike Fister, senior vice president and general manager of Intel’s Enterprise Platforms Group. “Intel-based supercomputers are enabling breakthrough research to happen faster and more affordably for government, commercial and academic institutions around the world. Our focus on this market segment and its future will benefit from our investment and work with key academia, government and industry advocates on the Advanced Computing Program effort.”</p>
<p>Other prominent Intel based systems on the TOP500 list include the fourth-ranked system at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) using 2,500 Intel Xeon processors, and the fifth-ranked system at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory using 1,936 Intel Itanium 2 processors. In addition, the seventh- and 10th-ranked systems on the list are at LLNL and use 2,304 and 1,920 Intel Xeon processors respectively. The 14th-ranked system at the Chinese Academy of Science uses 1,024 Intel Itanium 2 processors.</p>
<p>Intel’s Advanced Computing Program Enables Scalable, Manageable Supercomputing
As part of its focus to enable supercomputers built with ‘off-the-shelf’ components, Intel launched the Advanced Computing Program (ACP), a three-year US$36 million research and development initiative intended to enable traditional supercomputer users to quickly deploy scalable, high-performance computing systems that can be more easily used and managed.</p>
<p>Scientists from Intel will work with leaders in the high-performance computing community from academia, government, and industry to develop and prototype advanced computing technologies. These technologies will include new architectures to deliver effective scalability and computing balance, innovative advanced system software, and software tools, languages, and libraries to accelerate performance. Ultimately the ACP technologies will be deployed to the industry via next-generation ‘off-the-shelf’ computing building blocks, such as the Intel Xeon, Intel Itanium 2, and Intel® Pentium® 4 processors, along with ACP system recommendations.</p>
<p>“The Advanced Computing Program is a response to the need for more balanced high performance systems that have greater capabilities and better programming environments for end users,” said Justin Rattner, Intel senior fellow and director of the Intel Systems Technology Lab. “Intel is excited to help deliver a qualitative change in the way scientists and researchers will soon be able to do their work. We also intend to work with the industry to make sure that innovations developed at the high-end of computing will eventually benefit all computer users.”</p>
<p>Intel Demonstrates ‘Off-the-Shelf’ Teraflop Solution
Also at Supercomputing 2003, Intel led an industry collaboration to demonstrate an HPC cluster solutions that delivers over one teraflop of computing power using industry standard building blocks including InfiniBand* and PCI Express*. The configuration, assembled in less than two days on the show floor, highlights the ease in configuration of industry standard solutions as well as the performance of a 192 node Intel architecture platform based cluster. Historically, teraflop configurations have taken months to configure and have not been possible to demonstrate in a show environment.</p>
<p>About Intel
Intel, the world’s largest chip maker, is also a leading manufacturer of computer, networking and communications products. Additional information about Intel is available at www.intel.com/pressroom.
- ENDS -</p>
<p>Intel, the Intel logo, Pentium, Itanium and Intel Xeon are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and other countries.
* Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.
** TOP500 Supercomputers List, http://www.top500.org.</p>
<p>LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY SELECTS INTEL® ITANIUM® 2 PROCESSORS FOR WORLD’S MOST POWERFUL LINUX CLUSTER</p>
<p>Intel Itanium 2 Processor Enables Largest Supercomputer in United States to be Designed, Built and Fully Operational in Only Five Months</p>
<p>Sydney, Australia, 18 November 2003 - Intel Corporation, system manufacturer California Digital and the University of California at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) today announced they are building one of the world’s most powerful supercomputers. The supercomputer project, codenamed ‘Thunder’, uses nearly 4,000 Intel® Itanium® 2 processors. Thunder is expected to be complete in January.</p>
<p>“By utilising the high floating-point performance of Itanium 2 processors in open standards-based systems for high-end computing, this supercomputer will be designed and deployed in only five months,” said Richard Dracott, general manager of marketing and planning for Intel’s Enterprise Platforms Group. “Previous systems of this size and capability often took years to deploy.”</p>
<p>With a performance of more than 20 teraFLOP/s (trillions of floating point operations per second), Thunder will provide a world-class production resource to researchers working in areas supporting LLNL national security activities, including materials science, structural mechanics, electromagnetics, atmospheric and ocean science, seismology, biology, and magnetic and inertial confinement fusion.</p>
<p>“Thunder will serve a critical role supporting the Lab’s mission to drive unclassified science and technology for multiple program areas,” said Hal Graboske, LLNL deputy director of science and technology. “Intel Itanium 2 processors address capacity and capability issues facing national security and science programs, with a long-term goal to develop a viable path to petaFLOP/s-scale computing.”</p>
<p>“High-performance computing has always been crucial to our Stockpile Stewardship Program work, and it is especially important for our key materials science applications,” said</p>
<p>Bruce Goodwin, head of the Laboratory’s Defense and Nuclear Technologies Directorate. “The Laboratory looks forward to the increased horsepower that the Thunder system will provide. The cluster’s software environment benefits from Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASCI) investments. What we learn from this system will in turn benefit our ASCI program as it seeks future low-cost capacity and capability solutions.”</p>
<p>Thunder features 960 nodes, each using four Intel Itanium 2 processors operating at 1.4 GHz with 4MB level-three (L3) cache, 8 GB of memory and 73 GB UltraSCSI320 local disk. The systems include Intel® Gigabit Ethernet Controllers for cluster management, the Intel® PRO/1000 MT Dual Port Server Adapter to reduce bottlenecks and improve availability, and the Intel® E8870 Chipset, which is optimised for the Intel Itanium 2 processor to provide greater performance and scalability, and enhanced error detection, correction and containment. Intel® Solution Services will provide expertise in optimisation to help Thunder achieve maximum performance. The system will have more than 190 TB of global disk space.</p>
<p>According to the 22nd TOP500 list of supercomputers, Intel Itanium processor family-based systems account for 32 of the 500 most powerful computers in the world, an increase of 68 per cent in six months**.Thunder is expected to achieve second place on the next TOP500 List when it is published in June, and the system will be designed for easy expansion. LLNL has two Intel-based systems ranked seventh and 10th on the TOP500 list.</p>
<p>The TOP500 project was started in 1993 to provide a reliable basis for tracking and detecting trends in high-performance computing. Twice a year, a list of the sites operating the 500 most powerful computer systems is assembled and released.</p>
<p>Intel’s Itanium processor family addresses the rigorous requirements of scientific researchers, including superior floating-point performance, memory performance and support for large data sets. Many leading research organisations in addition to LLNL have deployed Itanium-based systems, including the U.S. National Center for Supercomputing Applications, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) of the U.S. Department of Energy, Cornell Theory Center, and the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN).</p>
<p>About California Digital
California Digital provides Linux-based compute clusters to both commercial and government customers, combining leading systems hardware, high-speed networking, and open-source cluster and management software. Additional information about California Digital is available at www.californiadigital.com.</p>
<p>About Intel
Intel, the world’s largest chip maker, is also a leading manufacturer of computer, networking and communications products. Additional information about Intel is available at www.intel.com/pressroom.</p>
<p>About Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
Founded in 1952, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a national security laboratory, with a mission to ensure national security and apply science and technology to the important issues of our time. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is managed by the University of California for the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration. Laboratory news releases and photos are also available at www.llnl.gov/PAO and on UC Newswire.</p>
<p>- ENDS -</p>
<p>Intel and Intel Itanium are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and other countries.
*Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.
**TOP500 Supercomputers List, http://www.top500.org.</p>
<p>For more information please contact:</p>
<p>Daniel Anderson
Intel Australia Pty Ltd
Tel: (02) 9937 5886
Mob: 0418 686 775
Email: daniel.anderson@intel.com</p>
<p>Amanda Wallace or Debbie Sassine
Spectrum Communications
Tel: (02) 9954 3299
Email: amandaw@spectrumcomms.com.au or
debbies@spectrumcomms.com.au</p>

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