South Korean Haansoft joins Linux group OSDL

Haansoft has joined Open Source Development Labs and will participate in the group's Carrier-Grade Linux working group.

South Korean Linux developer Haansoft has joined Open Source Development Labs (OSDL), a nonprofit industry group that promotes the use of the Linux operating system in enterprises, and will participate in OSDL's Carrier-Grade Linux working group, the group said Thursday.

The company's involvement should help the spread of linux in Asia, OSDL said. For example, Haansoft is also a developer of Asianux 2.0, the second version of the Asianux Linux distribution. Other companies behind Asianux are Red Flag Software, one of China's leading Linux developers, and Japan's Miracle Linux. Asianux 2.0 should be available in South Korea and China in July and in Japan in October.

Haansoft claims it is the largest software maker in South Korea and that its software accounts for 70 percent of the South Korean office productivity software market.

OSDL has been expanding its involvement in East Asia over the last 16 months as governments in the region have said they will support Linux and open-source software.

In March, South Korea's government-funded Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute joined the group.

OSDL signed up its first Chinese member, Beijing Co-Create Open Source Software, in January 2004. This was followed by Beijing Software Testing Center, one of China's largest software testing organizations. Red Flag joined in January 2005.

The organization has had a testing center in Japan since 2001 and Fujitsu, Hitachi, Miracle Linux, Mitsubishi Electric, NEC and Toshiba are members of OSDL's working group.

OSDL was founded in 2000 and other major OSDL members are Computer Associates International, Hewlett-Packard Co, IBM, Intel and Sun Microsystems.

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