GBU

Good

Network controller goes down, and so does this bank's entire ATM network, so IT gets called in to troubleshoot. She soon realizes this won't be a quick fix, so she reluctantly calls her fiance to tell him that she won't make their dinner date. "That's OK," he grumbles. "The ATM was down, so I couldn't get any money for dinner anyway!"

User says his PC is acting strangely, closing some applications and opening others on its own. IT can't detect a virus or any other problem with the PC, despite returning to the user's desk several times. But user keeps complaining about it. "I was in early one morning, so I went to check that PC before anyone arrived," says IT. "To my surprise, I found refrigerator magnets stuck all over the machine. When confronted, the user said he took them off when I came down because I had told others not to put magnets on their PCs."

Bad

A virus is wreaking havoc at the main office of this hospital group, so IT manager personally prepares antivirus disks for 13 clinics. Just one problem: "All 13 disks had a virus on them, because he had the virus on his own PC," sighs admin. "None of these field units was infected until they got his disk."

Ugly

A epidemiologic study of former semiconductor industry workers will go forward after a team of doctors at Johns Hopkins University determined there was enough data to proceed, the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) said in a statement.

SIA critics have been calling for such a study for years. Despite anecdotal evidence of cancer and other health issues among former semiconductor industry workers, highlighted by recent lawsuits against IBM, the industry had been reluctant to provide the historical data necessary to conduct such a study.

The SIA now plans to go forward with a retrospective epidemiological study examining cancer rates of wafer fabrication workers versus nonfabrication workers, and will post updates and the study's results on its Web site. (http://www.semichips.org)

Organizations such as the Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition and International Centre for Occupational Medicine at the University of California, have tried to conduct their own cancer studies, but have been rebuffed in their attempts to gather the necessary worker data.

Good

Network controller goes down, and so does this bank's entire ATM network, so IT gets called in to troubleshoot. She soon realizes this won't be a quick fix, so she reluctantly calls her fiance to tell him that she won't make their dinner date. "That's OK," he grumbles. "The ATM was down, so I couldn't get any money for dinner anyway!"

User says his PC is acting strangely, closing some applications and opening others on its own. IT can't detect a virus or any other problem with the PC, despite returning to the user's desk several times. But user keeps complaining about it. "I was in early one morning, so I went to check that PC before anyone arrived," says IT. "To my surprise, I found refrigerator magnets stuck all over the machine. When confronted, the user said he took them off when I came down because I had told others not to put magnets on their PCs."

Bad

A virus is wreaking havoc at the main office of this hospital group, so IT manager personally prepares antivirus disks for 13 clinics. Just one problem: "All 13 disks had a virus on them, because he had the virus on his own PC," sighs admin. "None of these field units was infected until they got his disk."

Ugly

A epidemiologic study of former semiconductor industry workers will go forward after a team of doctors at Johns Hopkins University determined there was enough data to proceed, the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) said in a statement.

SIA critics have been calling for such a study for years. Despite anecdotal evidence of cancer and other health issues among former semiconductor industry workers, highlighted by recent lawsuits against IBM, the industry had been reluctant to provide the historical data necessary to conduct such a study.

The SIA now plans to go forward with a retrospective epidemiological study examining cancer rates of wafer fabrication workers versus nonfabrication workers, and will post updates and the study's results on its Web site. (http://www.semichips.org)

Organizations such as the Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition and International Centre for Occupational Medicine at the University of California, have tried to conduct their own cancer studies, but have been rebuffed in their attempts to gather the necessary worker data.

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