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  • 14 Great Things iPhones and BlackBerrys Can Do

    Smartphones are intelligent, but with the 14 tips and tricks in this story, they could approach genius territory. We'll show you how to run seven separate devices from your iPhone, how to play Internet radio (mostly for free) on your BlackBerry, how to make free phone calls from an iPod Touch, and how to revive a dead cell phone battery (if it's detachable) while you're in winter weather.

  • Turn your iPhone into a remote mouse and keyboard

    When I give presentations, watch movies from the sofa in my office, or need to start a task away from my desk, I don't want to be within arm's length of my mouse. So I appreciate the freedom offered by Air Mouse Pro (US$6, buy-only), a full-featured remote control from R.P.A. Tech. The top half of the Air Mouse Pro Screen features a two-button trackpad, while the bottom half gives you a keyboard, along with controls for browsing the Web and playing movies and music.

  • The 10 biggest annoyances in Outlook

    Microsoft's highly capable email client Outlook is glitchy and has too many features for its own good.

  • Turning off disk defragmenter may solve a sluggish PC (Part 2)

    When we last left our intrepid blogger (way back on Friday), he'd pointed the finger at Vista's Disk Defragmenter and cried, "J'accuse!"

  • Turning off disk defragmenter may solve a sluggish PC

    For the last couple months I've been troubleshooting a vexing problem on my new quad-core HP desktop: Roughly once per week, the machine would start running as slow as molasses.

  • 10 Twitter tips for the workplace

    Having trouble convincing your boss that Twitter isn't a waste of time? Then you might find it interesting to learn that social media evangelists across the U.S. federal government are blasting out Tweets several times a day to their constituents. Here are their suggestions for how to integrate new media tools such as Twitter, Facebook and Flickr into a large, old-fashioned bureaucracy:

  • Rev up the Search Engines

    Your web startup needs to cut through the clutter and reel in customers, and search engine optimization (SEO) can be just the ticket. SEO helps improve your search rankings so your website shows up higher on Google, Yahoo and other popular search engines. "SEO is really [fundamental]. It should be a line item when you're developing your website," says Greg Bozigian, founder and chief media officer of new media marketing company Visionary View.

  • Find yourself on Google Latitude without GPS or a phone

    <a href="http://www.pcworld.com/tags/Google+Latitude.html">Google Latitude</a> is a useful--if slightly <a href="http://www.pcworld.com/businesscenter/article/158985/privacy_lobby_slams_google_latitude.html">creepy</a>--way to track your location on a mobile phone or GPS laptop. But you can get roughly the same sense of fleeting privacy on any old Wi-Fi PC; Google Latitude automatically pegged me within about 100 feet of my ground-floor office on GPS-free laptop.

  • Get started with virtual machines

    It's great to have multiple computers. On the first of them, you can install a database or crunch spreadsheets. On another, you can simply browse the Web, listen to music, and check your e-mail. Yet another can have a supercharged configuration for playing games. Sure, you could have all of your programs on the same, single computer, but some applications -- such as games -- can't run concurrently with other programs.

  • Ten fixes for Vista's worst features

    Just ask anyone who's seen Spiderman 3: good ideas seldom survive bad execution.

  • Ten cool Google Chrome tips and tweaks

    My guess is most people don't use Google's new Chrome Web browser as their primary browser yet. Google still has a long way to go with the browser adding features and fixing problems. Nevertheless, I've collected what I think are some of the most useful tips and the most interesting tweaks for the Chrome browser.

  • Ten tools to make Windows shine

    Are you worried about malware and spyware plaguing your system? I have a cool, free tool that gives you an extra layer of defense when you're Web surfing. I also have two free utilities that can lock up and hide your sensitive folders and keep them from prying eyes. Plus, for readers who didn't like my earlier tip for disabling the Insert key, I offer a nifty program to watch your Insert, Caps Lock, and Num Lock keys.

  • How to partition internal Flash memory on Cisco routers

    On most class B Flash file systems, you can partition banks of Flash memory into separate, logical devices so that the router can hold and maintain two or more different software images.

  • Kernel space: Ticket spinlocks

    Spinlocks are the lowest-level mutual exclusion mechanism in the Linux kernel. As such, they have a great deal of influence over the safety and performance of the kernel, so it is not surprising that a great deal of optimization effort has gone into the various (architecture-specific) spinlock implementations. That does not mean that all of the work has been done, though; a patch merged for 2.6.25 shows that there is always more which can be done.

  • Born from Firefox

    They are four applications designed to serve different purposes: A web browser, a music player and organizer, another that does the same for video, and a word processor for screenwriters. Yet they share one thing in common: All were built with a Mozilla-based toolkit, either the Gecko Runtime Environment or its successor, XULRunner. Both toolkits use the same codebase which runs Firefox.

  • Consultant: How to deal with Oracle licensing

    A consultant offered advice Tuesday regarding how Oracle customers can get the best deal and protect themselves while licensing software from the enterprise software giant.

  • Tutorial/How-to: Use Google apps to build your business

    Google is synonymous with searching the Web, but search isn't the company's sole focus. Google also provides top-notch services that other businesses can use to improve their Web presence, reach new customers, and make boatloads of money.

  • Kernel space: timerfd() and system call review

    One of the fundamental principles of Linux kernel development is that user-space interfaces are set in stone. Once an API has been made available to user space, it must, for all practical purposes, be supported (without breaking applications) indefinitely. There have been times when this rule has been broken, but, even in the areas known for trouble (sysfs, for example), the number of times that the user-space API has been broken has remained relatively small.

  • Prepare your network for VOIP

    Companies wanting to get the most use of voice over IP (VOIP) need to know the steps involved in hardening their network and Internet infrastructure to get the best results out of their digital voice deployment projects.

  • How to build a better Web site

    The Internet has brought a lot of business to My1Stop, a Kansas, U.S.-based printing company. About half of its $US20 million in annual revenue comes from Web traffic, says Michael Joseph, vice president of e-commerce.

  • What does the consumerisation of IT mean for today’s businesses?

    What role has the consumerisation of IT played in the shifting role of enterprise IT and the rise of shadow IT?

    Lenovo ThinkFWD

    Explore ThinkFWD to discover expert tips and advice for IT and business professionals on the latest tech trends, from mobility to performance and productivity, data centre and high-performance computing.