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  • Google Cloud offers streamlined Ubuntu for Docker use

    Google has adopted for use in its cloud a streamlined version of the Canonical Ubuntu Linux distribution tweaked to run Docker and other containers.

  • Stanford 'high-rise' chip takes on IoT and big data

    Stanford University researchers have built a multi-layered "high-rise" chip that could significantly outperform traditional computer chips, taking on the hefty workloads that will be needed for the Internet of Things and big data.

  • First lawsuit filed against Sony after massive hack

    Two former employees of Sony Pictures have filed a lawsuit against the company alleging it didn't do enough to safeguard their personal information and prevent its loss in a massive cyberattack in late November.

  • Google's surprise: ODF support launches ahead of schedule

    Following the comments by Google's head of open source, Chris DiBona, last week in London, Google has today announced that support for ODF (OpenDocument Format) has now been added to its Google Drive suite of apps. In a post on Google+, the team announced immediate support of ODT (ODF text documents), ODS (spreadsheets) and ODP (presentations), which can now all be imported into Google Docs.

  • Firefox pleads for cash with in-browser fundraiser

    Mozilla has been running a fundraiser from within its Firefox browser, a program that will run through the end of the year.

  • Instagram exposes 5 new filters for a more subtle effect

    Instagram's got five new filters that it hopes will improve people's smartphone photos by changing them less.

  • Compuware returns to its mainframe roots

    Returning to its roots as a mainframe software provider, Compuware has spun off is application performance management software unit.

  • Jury clears Apple of antitrust charges in US iTunes exclusivity case

    Apple didn't violate antitrust law by restricting music bought on iTunes from being played on devices other than iPods, a federal jury has decided.

  • New England security group shares threat intelligence, strives to bolster region as cybersecurity mecca

    The Advanced Cyber Security Center is a three year old organization with a bold mission to "bring together industry, university, and government organizations to address the most advanced cyber threats" and drive cybersecurity R&D in the New England region. Network World editor in Chief John Dix attended their most recent meeting in Boston and later tracked down ACSC Executive Director Charlie Benway and ACSC Board Chair William Guenther (CEO and Founder of Mass Insight) for a deep dive on the organization's goals.

  • Sony hackers turn to terror tactics, threaten cinemas

    The hackers who attacked Sony Pictures have apparently moved on to a new tactic: attempting to spread fear among the general public.

  • 2014: The year in quotes

    From rattled airline passengers who fear the coming of smartphones to jurors who don't know a smartphone from a tablet, here are some of the colorful quotes from IT news in 2014.

  • China was brutal to US tech firms in 2014

    Earlier this month, Amazon, Apple, and Facebook each welcomed China's top Internet regulator to their headquarters, for visits marked by smiles and laughter.

  • Microsoft throws open doors to Sway beta

    The beta test of Microsoft's newish Web-publishing app, Sway, is no longer by invitation-only: the company said today it's open to all.

  • Solar demand soars 16% this year

    Demand for solar power grew 16% year-over-year in 2014, representing 44 billion watts (gigawatts) of capacity purchased during the year.

  • Dutch regulator asks Facebook to hold off on privacy update, is rebuffed

    Saying that Facebook's new privacy policy could violate Dutch data protection laws, the privacy regulator in the Netherlands has asked it to postpone its introduction pending an investigation. But the social network won't hold back the rollout of new terms and policies on Jan. 1, and was "surprised and disappointed" by the data protection authority's move, a spokeswoman said.

  • Six technologies that will change PCs next year

    In an era of slick gadgets, PCs are the dinosaurs, ensnared in wire clutter, sporting tired 2D cameras and stricken with the occasional blue screen of death. Technology coming up in 2015, though, is set to make PCs more interactive, fun and perhaps nosier than you'd like them to be.

  • This Linux grinch could put a hole in your security stocking

    A grinch may be snatching away some year-end holiday time, forcing Linux system administrators to fill a gaping security hole in their systems.

  • Qualcomm, Intel and Brocade join group pushing 2.5G, 5G Ethernet

    The NBASE-T Alliance -- a recently formed umbrella group of networking industry players dedicated to keeping standard Ethernet cabling relevant -- announced a dozen new members on Monday, including big names such as Intel, Qualcomm and Brocade.

  • BMW wants to park your car with a smartwatch

    With BMW's Remote Valet Parking Assistant may you never have to set foot in a parking garage again: The car should find a place to park on its own. The feature can be controlled from a smartwatch and will be demonstrated at the International CES trade show in January.

  • Quantum physics deployed in quest for fraud-proof credit cards

    Researchers in the Netherlands are applying quantum physics in an attempt to create fraud-proof credit cards and ID cards.

  • Economist survey foresees shift in IT service delivery

    63% of LOBs expected growth of third-party tech services, while increased spending on enterprise IT services is anticipated by 65% of CIOs

    EMC

    A global leader in enabling businesses to transform their operations and deliver IT as a service.