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  • One code to rule them all: Dronecode

    Drones have just found their new best friends: coders. On Oct. 13, the Linux Foundation unveiled a nonprofit organization called the Dronecode Project, an open-source development initiative uniting thousands of coders for the purpose of building an aerial operating system for drones. Hopeful that the project will bring order to the chaos that has surrounded software developers as they sprint to carve out a share of the bourgeoning market for unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), UAS operators are now asking whether Dronecode will finally provide the horsepower and industry-wide support needed to launch a universal drone operating system.

  • What you should know about Lenovo's Motorola acquisition

    China's Lenovo finally has the global smartphone presence it has craved, finalizing the purchase of Motorola Mobility from Google for $US2.91 billion.

  • Sencha melds desktop and smartphone management with Space

    An upgraded version of Sencha's Space platform has the potential to bring together desktops, smartphones and tablets, with lower management costs along the way.

  • Apple leads the tablet line despite iPad sales decline

    Despite a continued shipment decline for its iPad product line, Apple maintained its lead in the worldwide tablet market...

  • Sorry movie goers, Google Glass, other wearables banned from cinemas

    Going to the movies this weekend? You better leave your pair of Google Glass at home or at least in your bag.

  • Drupal: If you weren't quick to patch, assume your site was hacked

    Users of Drupal, one of the most popular content management systems, should consider their sites compromised if they didn't immediately apply a security patch released on Oct. 15.

  • After rocket explosion, no air, water pollutants detected

    The initial assessment of the explosion that destroyed an Antares rocket and cargo craft on launch on Tuesday evening showed no signs that the blast emitted pollution into the water or air around the launch area in Virginia.

  • Microsoft releases stopgap POODLE protection for Internet Explorer

    Microsoft on Wednesday gave Windows customers an easier way to block attacks against Internet Explorer (IE) meant to steal browser session cookies and impersonate victims.

  • Smartphone share of overall mobile phone sales stalling at 70 percent

    Smartphones during the third quarter again accounted for about 70 percent of total mobile phone shipments. Prices need to fall even further to attract more users in emerging markets, but that won't happen overnight.

  • Pirate Bay co-founder found guilty of hacking in Denmark

    Pirate Bay co-founder Gottfrid Svartholm Warg was found guilty of hacking and serious vandalism in the Court of Fredriksberg in Denmark on Thursday.

  • Apple Pay rival MCX defends security after hackers steal emails

    The Merchant Customer Exchange (MCX), a consortium of 58 major U.S. retailers whose mobile payment network will take on the new Apple Pay early in 2015, today held a hastily-organized news conference to address questions about a hack that pilfered consumer email addresses.

  • Germany backs plan to retain personal flight data across EU

    The German government is calling for the EU-wide retention of personal flight data as an anti-terrorism measure, but is facing opponents who object to yet another database holding private information.

  • Startup Capriza scores $27M to Zapp legacy apps into mobile ones

    Capriza, a startup that helps enterprises convert their legacy apps into mobile- and cloud-based ones, Thursday announced it has racked up an additional $27 million in venture funding. That should be enough to help Capriza scale its business on the marketing and sales side, and maybe even have enough left over to afford a drummer and bassist to form a company band (more on that later...).

  • China: Facebook not banned, but must follow the rules

    China may be blocking access to Facebook, but that doesn't mean the social media network can't one day enter the country, as long as it follows the rules, a top government official said on Thursday.

  • Google AI project apes memory, programs (sort of) like a human

    The mission of Google's DeepMind Technologies startup is to "solve intelligence." Now, researchers there have developed an artificial intelligence system that can mimic some of the brain's memory skills and even program like a human.

  • Nintendo targets new health business with sleep sensor

    Nintendo has been stimulating people with video games for decades, but now it wants to help them sleep better.

  • Vodafone asks how data retention applies to M2M

    Vodafone seeks more clarity on how the data retention legislation introduced today will apply to machine-to-machine (M2M) data, among other questions.

  • Mixed responses from industry on data retention bill

    The government's new data retention bill has drawn mixed responses from industry with iiNet and Electronic Frontiers Australia opposing the legislation while Telstra is voicing its support.

  • China's Xiaomi surges to become world's third largest smartphone vendor

    Phones from Xiaomi still haven't arrived in the U.S., but the company's booming sales in China have been enough to make it the third largest smartphone vendor in the world.

  • Cunningham Lindsey uses Wi-Fi units to work during natural disasters

    After trialling a Wi-Fi unit during the Queensland floods in 2013 to process insurance claims in a timely fashion, Cunningham Lindsey rolled out Wi-Fi access points to its 48 Australian offices.