Web services development - News, Features, and Slideshows

News about Web services development
  • HTML5 finalized, finally

    After nearly eight years of work, the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) has finalized the HTML5 standard, bringing the basic Web technology firmly into the era of mobile devices and cloud-driven rich Internet applications.

  • Appcelerator gears up for the business world

    System administrators take note: That mobile employee expense app you're building should be every bit as easy to use as Facebook. Oh, and you better deliver it quickly too, because that's how Facebook rolls.

  • Ruby on Rails gets patches for SQL injection vulnerabilities

    Two SQL injection vulnerabilities were patched in Ruby on Rails, a popular open-source Web development framework used by some high-profile websites.

  • With components, Google agitates for a revolution in Web development

    At the Google I/O conference this week, the company vigorously lobbied developers to adopt a new programming model, one that could, the company asserted, make it radically easier to build Web applications.

  • Build mobile apps directly within the Firefox browser

    Programmers who may be curious about building mobile apps but aren't sure how to get started could get a hand from Mozilla, which is testing a new code editor, called WebIDE, which will be built into the Firefox browser.

Tutorials about Web services development
  • Get 5GB of free cloud-sync storage from SugarSync

    Wouldn't it be cool if you had a "magic" folder on your PC, one that automatically synced its contents with the Web, your other PCs, your cell phone, and other devices?

  • Keep kids safe online with OpenDNS FamilyShield

    You wouldn't let your kids walk the streets of Amsterdam's Red Light District, but giving them unrestricted access to the Web is practically the same thing. The problem is, how do you block out all that inappropriate Web content?

Features about Web services development
  • Has Digg dug its own grave?

    Some people just don't like change. Less than a week after Digg released version 4 of its social news-sharing site, fans have rebelled, flooding Digg with links from a rival sharing site, staging a "Quit Digg Day," and prophesying a major drop-off in traffic if the site doesn't return to its roots. Has Digg dug its grave, or is this yet another kneejerk neophobic reaction?