Web services development - News, Features, and Slideshows

News about Web services development
  • Apigee adds some Swagger to API design

    For developers who want to expose their Web applications to other computers and Internet services, API platform vendor Apigee is offering a free online tool to help create APIs using the increasingly popular Swagger API specification.

  • Microsoft makes debugging PHP less painful with new Azure tool

    Microsoft is equipping its Azure cloud service with a tool to debug PHP-based Web applications that are running on the platform.

  • Meteor JavaScript framework hits Windows

    Until now, developers who wanted to build Web and mobile apps via the Meteor JavaScript framework had to do so via either Mac or Linux clients. That changes today with the release of Meteor 1.1, which features support for Windows clients as well as the MongoDB 3.0 database.

  • Ractive aims to bring Web programming to the masses

    The developers of a JavaScript library for building interactive user interfaces are hoping their work will make Web programming more accessible for part-time programmers.

  • Google shares code to help server software digest HTTP/2

    Potentially offering a boost for web server software worldwide, Google has released as open source a framework for HTTP/2, the newly updated standard for transmitting Web pages and Web applications over the Internet.

Tutorials about Web services development
  • Get 5GB of free cloud-sync storage from SugarSync

    Wouldn't it be cool if you had a "magic" folder on your PC, one that automatically synced its contents with the Web, your other PCs, your cell phone, and other devices?

  • Keep kids safe online with OpenDNS FamilyShield

    You wouldn't let your kids walk the streets of Amsterdam's Red Light District, but giving them unrestricted access to the Web is practically the same thing. The problem is, how do you block out all that inappropriate Web content?

Features about Web services development
  • Has Digg dug its own grave?

    Some people just don't like change. Less than a week after Digg released version 4 of its social news-sharing site, fans have rebelled, flooding Digg with links from a rival sharing site, staging a "Quit Digg Day," and prophesying a major drop-off in traffic if the site doesn't return to its roots. Has Digg dug its grave, or is this yet another kneejerk neophobic reaction?

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