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  • Developer: Dump JavaScript for faster Web loading

    Web pages would be loaded quicker sans JavaScript via a proposal being floated by the editor of a fashion magazine, possibly as part of a still-theoretical "HTML6."

  • Critics slam World Wide Web Consortium over inclusion of DRM in HTML5

    The latest version of the World Wide Web Consortium's HTML Working Group charter includes provisions for ongoing work on restrictive content protection systems – a decision that has angered groups like the Electronic Frontier Foundation and Free Software Foundation.

  • Phoning Firefox: Browser now makes Web calls

    Mozilla today shipped Firefox 22, enabling the in-browser audio-video calling standard WebRTC and switching on a new JavaScript module that promises to speed up Web apps.

  • EFF blasts proposed DRM features in HTML5

    The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has issued an angry formal response to a proposed set of HTML5 standards from the World Wide Web Consortium, saying that stringent digital rights management technology will be harmful to online freedom and prevent many users from getting access to important content.

  • HTML5 is now feature-complete; here's what comes next

    The World Wide Web Consortium has a roster of proposed enhancements, including better forms, spell checking, and video captioning

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  • Could Facebook be your next phone company?

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • WebRTC close to tipping point as Cisco, Microsoft announce products

    It was all the way back in the Spring of 2011 that Google released WebRTC, its nascent real-time, browser-based, HTML5-powered, no-plugin-required video chat project to the public. In the three and a half years since, the Internet Engineering Task Force and the W3C have been working together to try to formalize the standard, prepare the stable 1.0 release, and get it ready for prime time.