U.S. Federal Communications Commission - News, Features, and Slideshows

News about U.S. Federal Communications Commission
  • CTIA: Mobile carriers still need lighter net neutrality rules

    The U.S. Federal Communications Commission should not hold mobile carriers to the same net neutrality rules as it does for wired broadband providers because of unique mobile network management challenges, the head of the largest U.S. mobile trade group said.

  • AT&T to pay $105 million to settle mobile-phone cramming charges

    AT&T will pay US$105 million to settle complaints from the U.S. Federal Communications Commission, the Federal Trade Commission and 51 state-level governments that it made millions of dollars through unauthorized third-party charges on customers' mobile-phone bills.

  • Marriott must pay $600,000 for blocking personal Wi-Fi hotspots

    Here's some payback for everyone who has felt gouged by hotel charges for Wi-Fi service: Marriott International has to pay US$600,000 following a probe into whether it intentionally blocked personal Wi-Fi hotspots in order to force customers to use its own very pricey service.

  • Groups accuse FCC of helping net neutrality advocates file comments

    The U.S. Federal Communications Commission engaged in the worst kind of "partisan politics" by working closely with net neutrality advocates to ensure their comments were filed with the agency, but not extending the same courtesy to the other side, a coalition of groups opposed to the regulations said in a sharply worded letter to the agency.

  • Group's numbers opposed to net neutrality smaller than suggested

    A conservative group that sent 2.4 million letters to the U.S. Congress opposed to net neutrality regulations didn't actually collect signatures from 2.4 million people, although the group's news release says the letters added millions of new voices to the debate.

Features about U.S. Federal Communications Commission
  • US court strikes down net neutrality: What's next?

    The U.S. Federal Communications Commission and its allies have several options, with most of them difficult, after a U.S. appeals court struck down most of the agency's 2010 net neutrality rules.

  • Cell phones on planes may be heading for the US, but will anyone use them?

    In-flight cellular in the U.S. may be closer to reality than some consumers realize, with foreign airlines poised to extend services they already offer elsewhere. But evidence from overseas suggests the odds of being trapped next to a chronic caller are slim.

  • FCC's in-flight cellphone plan carries a lot of baggage

    Anyone who dreads hearing one end of a loud phone call all the way from Anchorage to Miami, take heart: The plan to allow cellphones on planes could fail in more ways than an overbooked flight at a snowbound airport on Christmas Eve.

  • Net neutrality faces uncertain court ruling in US

    It's difficult to predict how an appeals court will rule after it hears arguments Monday in Verizon Communication's challenge of the U.S. Federal Communications Commission's net neutrality rules.

  • What Obama's re-election may mean for technology

    The US presidential election result leaves President Barack Obama in the White House and maintains the balance of power in Congress. In many longstanding technology debates, policy experts see little movement forward, although lawmakers may look for compromises on a handful of issues.