storage

storage - News, Features, and Slideshows

Features

  • How Apple could exploit a forever-free iCloud

    While Google and Microsoft are using large amounts of free cloud storage to sell inexpensive consumer notebooks, Apple has stood above the fray.

  • Read this before you buy another hard drive

    It's rare that a company would release internal data on drive failure rates -- even more so when that company, Backblaze, earns its living storing consumer data in the cloud. That makes the hard drive data released this week even more valuable.

  • RAM wars: RRAM vs. 3D NAND flash, and the winner is... us

    While resistive RAM's chances of crowding out NAND flash anytime soon are slim, the coming RAM wars mean mobile users are likely to have hundreds of gigabytes, or even a terabyte, of storage at their fingertips.

  • Here, there, everywhere: 3 personal Cloud storage systems

    Cloud storage has become increasingly popular, both for individuals and companies, as a place to stash everything from tax records to family photos. Services such as Dropbox, Box, SugarSync or Google Drive offer the chance to easily store your data and then access it from any of your devices.

  • New storage technologies to deal with the data deluge

    Enterprise storage demands are reaching a critical point, and vendors are scrambling to develop new products to deal with the data deluge. We look at how these technologies will help manage the major pain points for storage administrators.

  • How big is the sound of music?

    Music fans and major recording artists are adopting lossless audio file formats to keep copies of their music thats as close to a master recording as possible, leading to multi-terabyte-sized home music storage systems.

  • Tape storage finds new life in the enterprise and beyond

    Tape is not dead - far from it. In fact, many enterprises depend on it for cost-effective long-term storage. Tape is also finding new applications in the virtualized and increasingly video-centric world of IT. As enterprises deal with bigger sets of data, tape will play a vital role going forward.

  • 2012: The year in quotes

    Some of the most memorable IT-related quotes were uttered in courtrooms this year, which involved a steady stream of legal challenges about intellectual property. In no particular order, these are some of the comments that stuck with us as 2012 winds to a close.

  • "The Human Face of Big Data" offers a geek-out-worthy coffee-table book

    "The Human Face of Big Data" is an ambitious and attractive new large-format book that aims to give readers, through photography and short articles, a glimpse of how powerful new data processing capabilities are changing people's lives. Author Rick Smolan is a photographer who gained fame for his "Day in the Life" series, which included an edition focused on the Internet in 1996, "24 Hours in Cyberspace." He says that his latest work is based on the premise that "our planet is beginning to develop a nervous system."

  • The evolution of hard disk drives

    A punched card was once the basis for digital information used for computer programs and data storage. They were widely used throughout the first half of the 20th century in processing machines to input data and to store it. Punch cards could be fed into the first commercial computer, IBM 305 system, which then stored the data on hard disks

  • Delorean hard drive is perfect for time machine

    Attention all Back To The Future fans: If you're in the market for a new hard drive, then the folks over at Flash Rods have something just for you. Flash Rods latest, known as the Delorean Time Machine Hard Drive, contains a 500GB Seagate drive within the chassis of the much-loved Delorean from the Back To The Future trilogy.

  • Burning questions: Virtualisation

    Virtualizing x86 infrastructure isn't just a one-step process -- as servers change, the whole data center must change as well. While server hypervisors such as VMware's ESX, Microsoft's Hyper-V and Xen can make IT more efficient and cost-effective, many of the virtualization advantages can be canceled out when data centers rely on technology and processes that haven't been updated for the virtualization age.

  • NASs for the masses

    Either because server disks are full or because virtualization is a natural growth path, organizations large and small are moving toward shared storage. For large enterprises, high-capacity storage-area networks make sense, but what about small or mid-sized enterprises new to shared storage?

  • A waste of space: Bulk of drive capacity still underutilized

    Near the turn of the century, data centers were only beginning to implement Fibre Channel storage-area networks (SAN), with most relying on direct-attached storage (DAS). Data utilization rates were abysmal, with data centers on average using just 25% to 30% of their hard disk drive capacity.

  • Beauty shots: Technology to drool over

    Sling Media's small Slingbox 700U won one of three Best in Show awards given by the Industrial Designers Society of America (ISDA).

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