SSD

SSD - News, Features, and Slideshows

News about SSD
Features about SSD
  • Four considerations for SSD deployment

    While solid state drives offer increased performance, the key to figuring out the role they can play in the data center is balancing that performance against cost.

  • OCZ's new Agility SSD is true to its name

    OCZ has had its share of problems out of the gate with its low-end, consumer solid-state disk drive, the Apex Series SATA II. But its most recent economy SSD, the Agility Series SATA II 2.5-in., appears to be a successful effort to correct old problems with fresh technology. The Agility has ample cache to boost write performance and, most important, uses a higher-end controller. Yet it is only slightly more expensive than the Apex, which is still being sold.

  • Solid-state disks offer 'fast erase' features

    As the pilot ejects inside enemy territory, the fighter jet triggers an automatic data-destruction sequence. Within 15 seconds, the highly classified mission data on the solid-state disk has been wiped out.

  • Which operating system is best for SSDs?

    Solid-state disk (SSD) drive architecture can play a big role in how fast a computer boots up and performs. But how big a role the SSDs play -- and how much faster an operating system is -- depends as much on the operating system as on the drive. Although none of the mainstream operating systems now in use have been optimized to work better with SSDs, some do natively work more efficiently than others, according to storage experts.

  • How to equip your PC with SSD for about $200

    A lot of solid-state disk (SSD) drive reviews and features have been circulating around the Internet lately, and I've noticed that the speeds of those products are increasing remarkably, even as manufacturers use more multilevel cell (MLC) NAND flash memory in their products, which is innately slower than single-level cell (SLC) NAND.

Whitepapers about SSD

  • Flash implications in enterprise storage array designs

    This whitepaper examines some common practices in enterprise storage array design and discusses opportunities for improving enterprise storage strategy by thinking with random I/O rather than sequential. A good enterprise storage array attempts to sequentialise the workload seen by the hard drives, regardless of the native data pattern at the host level. A single Solid State Drive (SSD) is capable of random I/O that would require hundreds of hard drives to match. However, obtaining this performance from an SSD is challenging. A new class of enterprise data storage system doesn’t substitute flash, but engineers an entirely new array to unlock flash’s full performance potential and deliver array-based capabilities

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