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Features

  • Why R? The pros and cons of the R language

    The R programming language is an important tool for development in the numeric analysis and machine learning spaces. With machines becoming more important as data generators, the popularity of the language can only be expected to grow. But R has both pros and cons that developers should know.

  • Microsoft takes yet another shot at defining 'free' for Windows 10 testers

    Microsoft on Monday took another shot at clarifying its Windows 10 upgrade policy, telling Windows Insider participants that they had to remain in the preview program if they had not upgraded from an eligible PC but wanted to continue running the OS free of charge.

  • Clear as mud: Microsoft struggles to define 'free' for Windows 10

    Microsoft's Keystone Kops-like revelation that Windows 10 testers would get a free copy of the OS -- yes, no, then yes, probably, but with strings -- may be confusing compared to Apple's approach to OS X, but reflects the much more complicated ecosystem the Redmond, Wash. company maintains.

  • FAQ: How Microsoft will update Windows 10

    Microsoft is just weeks away from pushing customers into a radical overhaul of how they receive security, maintenance and new feature updates.

  • Microsoft goes vague on Windows 10 support

    Microsoft is hanging a lot of Windows 10 on a single phrase: "supported lifetime of the device."

  • Videoconferencing do's and don'ts (with video!)

    When it comes to videoconferencing, Daniel Post Senning would like to remind you the game is yours to win -- or lose. "Your ability to handle and manage [videoconferencing] tools says something about your professional brand and who you are," says Senning, author of Emily Post's Manners in a Digital World, Living Well Online and spokesperson with The Emily Post Institute. And that includes not just your technical savvy, but your social skills as well, Senning says.

  • Microsoft can't kick the OS-for-money habit

    Old habits die hard.

  • Android Pay likely at Google I/O as Samsung preps its own service

    Google is expected to reveal details about Android Pay at its annual I/O conference this week, even as Samsung readies its own separate mobile payment service.

  • Java at 20: How it changed programming forever

    Remembering what the programming world was like in 1995 is no easy task. Object-oriented programming, for one, was an accepted but seldom practiced paradigm, with much of what passed as so-called object-oriented programs being little more than rebranded C code that used >> instead of printf and class instead of struct. The programs we wrote those days routinely dumped core due to pointer arithmetic errors or ran out of memory due to leaks. Source code could barely be ported between different versions of Unix. Running the same binary on different processors and operating systems was crazy talk.

  • Java at 20: Its successes, failures, and future

    Although Java was developed at Sun Microsystems, Oracle has served as the platform's steward since acquiring Sun in early 2010. During that time, Oracle has released Java 7 and Java 8, with version 9 due up next year. InfoWorld Editor at Large Paul Krill recently spoke to Oracle's Georges Saab, vice president of software development for the Java Platform Group, about the occasion of Java's 20th anniversary.

  • Java at 20: The JVM, Java's other big legacy

    Think of Java, which celebrates its 20th anniversary this week, and your first thoughts most likely go to the language itself. But underneath the language is a piece of technology that has a legacy at least as important and powerful as Java itself: the Java virtual machine, or JVM.

  • Java at 20: The programming juggernaut rolls on

    What began as an experiment in consumer electronics in the early 1990s celebrates its 20th anniversary as a staple of enterprise computing this week. Java has become a dominant platform, able to run wherever the Java Virtual Machine is supported, forging ahead despite the rise of rival languages and recent tribulations with security.

  • What if Windows went open source tomorrow?

    Thinking out loud about Microsoft making Windows an open source project is a great way to get your friends and colleagues wondering seriously about your mental health. It's an idea strange enough to sound practically paradoxical, like "hot ice" or "short Pink Floyd songs."

  • If Windows 10 is the 'last version,' it needs names

    With Microsoft saying that Windows 10 "is the last version of Windows", the company may have a naming problem.

  • Collaboration companies argue their case at Demo Traction

    The recent Demo Traction event showcased a host of young companies that are gaining market momentum.  Each gave their pitch and then answered to a panel of judges.  If it is important for you to stay on the up and up with emerging technologies, this is must watch stuff.

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