social networking

social networking - News, Features, and Slideshows

Features

  • 10 tidbits from Twitter's IPO filing

    Twitter made its IPO documents public Thursday and in the process revealed some juicy information about the company, like how much money it makes (or loses) and how much its executives get paid. Here are a few of the details we learned about Twitter today.

  • Zuckerberg dazzles Wall Street with Q3 mobile progress

    Facebook, which had been in the doghouse with Wall Street since it went public, wowed investors with its third-quarter report on Tuesday, in particular with its improvements and early results in the crucial mobile market.

  • First Look: Facebook Single Sign-on

    Facebook is getting serious about on-the-go social networking with a suite of new features announced during the Facebook Mobile event on Wednesday.

  • Can you trust Facebook Places?

    Facebook, the company many people don't trust to protect their status updates and personal information, is now in the business of collecting location information, thanks to the introduction of its Foursquare/Gowalla killer, Facebook Places.

  • Can Facebook privacy be simple?

    Facebook, according to its CEO, is built around the simple idea that people want to share things with "their friends and the people around them."  

  • Is Facebook truly sorry for its privacy sins?

    Want an expert lesson in how to respond without actually responding and how to apologize without saying you're sorry? Then you need to read Facebook CEO Mark Zukerberg's quasi-mea culpa in today's Washington Post. Do it now; I'll wait.

  • Good-bye to privacy?

    New Yorker Barry Hoggard draws a line in the sand when it comes to online privacy. In May he said farewell to 1251 Facebook friends by deleting his account of four years to protest what he calls the social network's eroding privacy policies.

  • Social networking exposes business networks to risk

    Once upon a time, instant messaging was a consumer technology. That consumer toy worked its way into the corporate network and was eventually not just accepted, but embraced and leveraged as a valuable tool.

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