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  • Netflix open sources internal threat monitoring tools

    Netflix has released three internal tools it uses to catch hints on the Web that hackers might target its services.

  • Brandis mum on data retention cost

    Attorney-General George Brandis has reiterated the government's intention to introduce a mandatory data retention regime but failed to answer a query by Greens Senator Scott Ludlam on what the cost of such a scheme is likely to be.

  • Cleveland Indians turn to SIEM in malware, botnet battle

    For the Cleveland Indians' IT department, dealing with malware on behalf of hundreds of Windows-using employees at the baseball team's Progressive Field data center operations can be a little bit like a pitcher facing a stacked batting line-up: a constant battle.

  • Tesla recruits hackers to boost vehicle security

    Electric carmaker Tesla Motors wants security researchers to hack its vehicles. In coming months, the Silicon Valley based high-tech carmaker will hire up to 30 full-time hackers whose job will be to find and close vulnerabilities in the sophisticated firmware that controls its cars.

  • Feds issue bulletin warning about malicious 'Google dorking' cyber actors

    If you are good at research by using Google searches, does that make you a malicious cyber actor? Of course not, but DHS, FBI and NCTC (National Counterterrorism Center) have issued a bulletin warning about malicious "Google dorking" cyber actors. If using advanced search techniques on Google or Bing is considered suspicious, what does that make Shodan users who specifically target SCADA, ICS, VoIP, routers, switches, webcams and printers to name but a few?

Tutorials about security
  • How to protect yourself against privileged user abuse

    The typical organization loses 5% of its revenues to fraud by its own employees each year, with most thefts committed by trusted employees in executive management, operations, accounting, sales, customer service or purchasing, according to the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE). This type of malicious behavior by "privileged users" who have been given broad access to the company's computer assets has captured the attention of CIOs across the country.

  • Open source FreeOTFE encrypts disks handily

    FreeOTFE may sound like a political bumper sticker, but it stands for "Free On The Fly Encryption." The "Free" part is self-explanatory; "On The Fly Encryption" refers to the encrypting/decrypting of data as it is written to or read from your hard disk.

  • BlackBerry 6: Wipe Your Smartphone, Restore Factory Settings

    Many reasons exist for why you might want or need to "security wipe" a BlackBerry, or completely erase all personal data stored on your handheld: You got a new smartphone and plan to retire the older device; you're trading in your existing BlackBerry for a new one from your wireless carrier; you and a friend are swapping devices; you loaded too many applications or media and just want to start over from scratch; etc.

  • Record patch Tuesday: What you need to know

    Today is the final Microsoft Patch Tuesday for 2010. It has been a busy year for Microsoft when it comes to security bulletins, and December is no exception as Microsoft closes out the year with a record 17 security bulletins. With only a week or so until many IT admins plan to kiss 2010 goodbye and break for the holidays, it is important to understand and prioritize the latest patches for quick implementation.

  • How to check if your password was exposed in Gawker hack

    A security researcher today provided a way for users to see whether their e-mail addresses and passwords were among the 1.3 million compromised in a hack of Gawker Media's sites.

Features about security

Whitepapers about security

  • 7 must haves for mobile app security

    Mobile devices are not just another type of endpoint. Inherent features (e.g., camera, accelerometer, proximity sensor, etc.) coupled with the always-connected, readily available nature of these devices represent an opportunity for improvement in enterprise user productivity. Enterprises can begin to realize this potential by allowing use of corporate data in both custom-built and commercially available mobile apps. Mobile workflows resulting from interactions between these apps can be faster and more intuitive than those on a PC. However, the need to always retain control over corporate data should give an enterprise pause before sanctioning the widespread use of sensitive business information on mobile devices.

  • Give all the people what they want (safely)

  • When mobile device management isn't enough

  • Password reset: The time vampire of the IT universe