privacy

privacy - News, Features, and Slideshows

Features

  • Privacy is the new killer app

    A funny thing is happening in the wake of the <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2490179/security0/security0-the-snowden-leaks-a-timeline.html">Edward Snowden NSA revelations</a>, the infamous <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2601905/apple-icloud-take-reputation-hits-after-photo-scandal.html">iCloud hack of celebrity nude photos</a>, and the hit parade of customer data breaches at <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2490637/security0/target-finally-gets-its-first-ciso.html">Target</a>, <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2844491/home-depot-attackers-broke-in-using-a-vendors-stolen-credentials.html">Home Depot</a> and the <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/article/2845621/government/us-postal-service-suffers-breach-of-employee-customer-data.html">U.S. Postal Service</a>. If it's not the government looking at your data, it's bored, lonely teenagers from the Internet or credit card fraudsters.

  • Google's move into home automation means even less privacy

    Plans by smart thermostat maker Nest Labs to share some customer data with corporate parent Google means the search engine giant will be fending off privacy concerns as it expands into home automation.

  • Malvertising rise pushes ad industry to action

    With hidden malware on the rise, the online advertising industry may finally have to get its governance act together.

  • Is EU's 'right to be forgotten' really the 'right to edit the truth'?

    With Europe's top court ordering Google to allow people to basically edit their online personal histories, some wonder what this will mean for finding the truth online.

  • U.S. commercial drone industry struggles to take off

    The U.S. commercial drone industry is still struggling to get off the ground more than two years after President Obama signed into law a bill that permits the civilian use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) over the country's airspace.

  • Ad tracking: Is anything being done?

    Online tracking is on the rise, but efforts to create a practical Do Not Track policy have slowed to a crawl. Meanwhile, users and browser companies are taking matters into their own hands.

  • Trust issue looms large for tech companies capitalizing on personal data

    As tech companies increasingly rely on analyzing and selling user data to boost revenue, trust is emerging as one of the defining issues of the year for the IT sector.

  • Obama in awkward spot after privacy board calls NSA snooping illegal

    A report Thursday by the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board calling the NSA's bulk phone records collection program illegal and mostly useless puts the Obama Administration in an awkward spot.

  • Perspective: Payment system security needs less talk, more action

    Retailers and banks must move quickly to figure out who should be responsible for better securing the payments system network or risk having Congress decide for them.

  • Debate over NSA surveillance shifts with judge's ruling, task force report

    After six months of contentious debate over U.S. National Security Agency surveillance programs, prompted by leaks from former government contractor Edward Snowden, the third week in December may have marked a major turning point.

  • Are your smartphone apps selling you out?

    Apple's App Store, Google's Play store and other app stores are packed with apps that can compromise your security and privacy without you ever knowing anything bad happened. What's a mobile app user to do?

  • Perspective: Privacy concerns could keep Amazon delivery drones grounded

    Amazon's nascent plan to use unmanned drones to deliver packages to customers has already raised strong privacy concerns that could ultimately nip it in the bud.

  • Perspective: Curbing data use is key to reining in NSA

    Any effort to rein in the National Security Agency after its widespread spy activities were revealed in leaked documents must focus on more than simply limiting what personal data can be collected.

  • Lavabit-DOJ dispute zeroes in on encryption key ownership

    The government's insistence, in its dispute with Lavabit, that cloud service providers hand over their encryption keys when asked, has refocused attention on the issue of key ownership and management in the cloud.

  • There's no free lunch when it comes to Google's Gmail

    There's no such thing as a free email service, at least not when it comes to Google, according to industry analysts.