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News about popular science
  • Amazon seeks US exemption to test delivery drones

    Amazon.com has asked the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration permission to test drones outdoors for use in its Prime Air package delivery service.

  • Could a quadcopter land rovers on Mars?

    Taking a page from NASA's rocket powered landing craft from it most recent Mars landing mission, the European Space Agency is showing off a quadcopter that the organization says can steer itself to smoothly lower a rover onto a safe patch of the rocky Martian surface.

  • NASA to send 'flying saucer' on first flight this week

    Typically the stuff of mystery, a real flying saucer could appear over the Hawaiian island of Kauai later this week, but it won't be coming from outer space. The rocket-powered, saucer-like craft is part of a NASA project that could aid missions to other planets.

  • US FAA outlines restrictions for model aircraft in wake of reckless use

    The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration on Monday interpreted existing rules to prohibit hobbyists' model aircraft from flying within 5 miles (8 kilometers) of an airport without clearance from the airport or ground control.

  • USENIX researchers get a grip on Hadoop performance

    Now that big data technologies like Apache Hadoop are moving into the enterprise, system engineers must start building models that can estimate how much work these distributed data processing systems can do and how quickly they can get their work done.

Features about popular science
  • Here's why Amazon drones may never land at your door

    Amazon's ambitious plan to use flying drones to deliver packages is far-fetched, but not just because of technology limitations or air traffic regulations. Amazon's fulfillment center network, as it stands now, is too limited to serve even a tiny fraction of the U.S. in the method described by CEO Jeff Bezos.

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    40 years ago, Ethernet's fathers were the startup kids

    Bob Metcalfe, Dave Boggs and the rest of the scientists at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center in 1973 were a lot like young developers at a Silicon Valley startup today.

  • Worst security snafus of 2012

    The first half of 2012 was pretty bad - from the embarrassing hack of a conversation between the FBI and Scotland Yard to a plethora of data breaches - and the second half wasn't much better, with events including Symantec's antivirus update mess and periodic attacks from hactivists at Anonymous.

  • Can the US military fight a war with Twitter?

    Students at a U.S. military graduate school in California are mining social media with new methods that may change the way the armed forces collect intelligence overseas.

  • NASA research finds way into IT, consumer products

    Aware of a history of heart disease in his family, then-50-year-old Gary F. Thompson saw his doctor for a checkup before he ran a Los Angeles marathon in the mid-1990s.