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News about popular science
  • NASA's Maven spacecraft snaps 'unprecedented' images of Mars

    NASA's latest spacecraft sent to study the Martian atmosphere is already collecting data.

  • Scientists harness smartphones as cosmic ray detectors

    Your phone can receive messages from around the world. But how about emanations from beyond our solar system?

  • Calling Dr. Algorithm

    Imagine that almost every household had an inexpensive, easy-to-use, handheld gadget capable of automatically measuring key vital signs (blood pressure, blood oxygen level, heart rate, respiratory rate, temperature) as well as accurately diagnosing more than a dozen serious illnesses (including anemia, diabetes, hepatitis A, pneumonia, tuberculosis and stroke). This device would also be able to instantly share the information it collects with professional caregivers when appropriate.

  • NASA's orbiters, rovers prep for rare comet close-up

    Mars robotic rovers and orbiters are set to have a front row seat for a comet that will be flying past the Red Planet so close it will be less than one-tenth the distance of any known comet flyby of Earth.

  • Astronauts to make robotics repairs during 6.5-hour spacewalk

    Two astronauts today began what is expected to be a six-and-a-half-hour spacewalk to repair a robotics system, along with cooling pump and a television camera on the International Space station.

Features about popular science
  • Boston's Bolt launches hardware companies

    Watch the first episode in our new series Breakout Startups here.

  • Here's why Amazon drones may never land at your door

    Amazon's ambitious plan to use flying drones to deliver packages is far-fetched, but not just because of technology limitations or air traffic regulations. Amazon's fulfillment center network, as it stands now, is too limited to serve even a tiny fraction of the U.S. in the method described by CEO Jeff Bezos.

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    40 years ago, Ethernet's fathers were the startup kids

    Bob Metcalfe, Dave Boggs and the rest of the scientists at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center in 1973 were a lot like young developers at a Silicon Valley startup today.

  • Worst security snafus of 2012

    The first half of 2012 was pretty bad - from the embarrassing hack of a conversation between the FBI and Scotland Yard to a plethora of data breaches - and the second half wasn't much better, with events including Symantec's antivirus update mess and periodic attacks from hactivists at Anonymous.

  • Can the US military fight a war with Twitter?

    Students at a U.S. military graduate school in California are mining social media with new methods that may change the way the armed forces collect intelligence overseas.