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  • Google lawsuit against Rockstar to stay in California

    A Google complaint against Apple-backed patent consortium Rockstar will stay in a California court rather than be moved to Texas where Rockstar already has patent lawsuits against Google's Android partners, the California court ordered Thursday.

  • Google lawsuit against Rockstar to stay in California

    A Google complaint against Apple-backed patent consortium Rockstar will stay in a California court rather than be moved to Texas where Rockstar already has patent lawsuits against Google's Android partners, the California court ordered Thursday.

  • BlackBerry presses for immediate halt to Typo keyboards

    BlackBerry has asked a California court to immediately block sales of an add-on iPhone keyboard made by Typo, alleging the startup backed by TV and radio personality Ryan Seacrest misled the court.

  • Apple and Samsung spar over huge damages claim

    Apple outlined for the first time on Friday how it came up with the US$2.2 billion in damages that it wants a California jury to award it for Samsung's alleged "massive infringement" of five Apple patents.

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    Samsung's lawyers try to put a human face on Android

    Samsung's lawyers tried to put a human face on Google's Android development efforts as they opened their defense Friday against Apple's patent infringement claims and its demand for US$2.2 billion in damages.

Features about patent
  • Patent cases color mobile market, to continue in 2013

    Over the past year, patent battles have been fought by tech companies in courtrooms all over the world. The litigation is far from over though, however, and will continue throughout 2013. This is what's at stake on the patent battlefield in the near future.

  • Apple and Samsung: What's behind the patent fight

    Samsung took a step toward finding a kind of "pax tabletica" with arch-foe Apple in an Australian court last week, offering to remove features from its Galaxy Tab to avoid a court ban on sales of the device in that country. But what's really interesting about the case isn't the technical litigation, but the underlying attempt to define how much of a product's design is actually protected under existing, fragmented international laws.

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