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  • DCHQ Releases Docker management product into GA with 35 enterprise users

    <a href="http://www.prweb.net/Redirect.aspx?id=aHR0cDovL2RjaHEuY28v">DCHQ</a> is a startup building software for enterprises using Docker for application deployment and lifecycle management. Founded by MIT graduate Amjad Afanah, who formerly managed application automation offerings for <a href="http://www.vmwareinc.com/">VMware</a> and cloud management solutions for Oracle, DCHQ is looking to fill a very important space: while every forward-looking IT department on the planet sees containers in general and Docker in particular as the way forward, there is a lack of mature management tools with which to keep everything in check. True there are a number of different products looking to fill space, but there is no dominant player, or group of players, as yet.

  • OpenStack is redefining the business model for data solutions

    This vendor-written tech primer has been edited by Network World to eliminate product promotion, but readers should note it will likely favor the submitter's approach.

  • Java at 20: Its successes, failures, and future

    Although Java was developed at Sun Microsystems, Oracle has served as the platform's steward since acquiring Sun in early 2010. During that time, Oracle has released Java 7 and Java 8, with version 9 due up next year. InfoWorld Editor at Large Paul Krill recently spoke to Oracle's Georges Saab, vice president of software development for the Java Platform Group, about the occasion of Java's 20th anniversary.

  • Java at 20: The JVM, Java's other big legacy

    Think of Java, which celebrates its 20th anniversary this week, and your first thoughts most likely go to the language itself. But underneath the language is a piece of technology that has a legacy at least as important and powerful as Java itself: the Java virtual machine, or JVM.

  • Java at 20: The programming juggernaut rolls on

    What began as an experiment in consumer electronics in the early 1990s celebrates its 20th anniversary as a staple of enterprise computing this week. Java has become a dominant platform, able to run wherever the Java Virtual Machine is supported, forging ahead despite the rise of rival languages and recent tribulations with security.

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