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News about NEC
  • NT cops use facial recognition to fight crime

    The Northern Territory Police Force is using facial recognition technology to identify criminals through a database of photos and match them against any image or CCTV footage.

  • DFAT signs services contract with NEC

    The Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) has has signed a four year support centre services contract with NEC Australia.

  • 9 things you didn't know about Google's undersea cable

    Undersea cables carry virtually all transoceanic Internet data these days, replacing satellites as the preferred medium. Google and some telecom companies invested in one of them, called FASTER, that will stretch 9,000 kilometers between the U.S. and Japan and is due to go into operation next year.

  • Here's what it takes to lay Google's 9000km undersea cable

    It takes a plow the size of a small house, a robot the size of a truck and a purpose-built ship to install Google's latest oceanic infrastructure project - a super-fast submarine Internet cable linking the US and Japan.

  • Google's 60Tbps Pacific cable welcomed with champagne in Japan

    With bottles of bubbly and a purification ceremony, a Google-backed undersea cable was given a warm welcome on a beach in Japan last week, a critical step in building the highest capacity data link in the Pacific ever created.

Features about NEC
  • Big names like Google dominate open-source funding

    <em>Network World's</em> analysis of publicly listed sponsors of 36 prominent open-source non-profits and foundations reveals that the lion's share of financial support for open-source groups comes from a familiar set of names.

  • Tablet revolution reality check

    With so much chatter about tablets this year, you might think that the handheld, rectangular devices being unveiled represent a significant innovation. The reality is that so much of what we're seeing is not a whole lot different than what we saw in previous years; these products offer only a few new twists. But those new twists could make the difference between tablets' remaining a niche item and their finally busting out to the mass market in a meaningful way.

  • Where's USB 3.0?

    It seems as if we've been writing about USB 3.0 forever, but it has really been only about two years since Intel and other parties formed a promotional group for USB 3.0 in 2007. The spec was completed in November 2008, at which time the standard's backers said that a glut of devices would hit the market late this year. Well, that statement turned out to be almost right: Devices are coming very soon, but the glut won't be until next year.