javascript

javascript - News, Features, and Slideshows

News about javascript
  • Developer: Dump JavaScript for faster Web loading

    Web pages would be loaded quicker sans JavaScript via a proposal being floated by the editor of a fashion magazine, possibly as part of a still-theoretical "HTML6."

  • Instant feedback arrives for JavaScript code testing

    Developers looking for quick results when testing JavaScript code could have a solution with the Wallaby.js test runner tool, a code coverage technology intended to offer nearly immediate reporting of results.

  • Scriptr: Write your Internet of Things in JavaScript

    Scriptr, the company behind the the scriptr.io scripting engine launched this week, is looking to link developers to the Internet of things.

  • Scala.js lets you compile Scala to JavaScript

    Scala, developed as a functional and object-oriented language for the Java Virtual Machine, is now multiplatform, with developers using it in abundance on JavaScript via Scala.js, Scala founder Martin Odersky says.

  • JavaScript unites Microsoft and Google

    Version 2.0 of the popular AngularJS JavaScript framework will be built on TypeScript, Microsoft's superset of the scripting language that compiles to JavaScript, thanks to a partnership between Microsoft and Google.

Features about javascript
  • Brendan Eich tells how to prevent JavaScript memory leaks

    The JavaScript founder details where developers can go wrong and the straightforward methods to stay on track

  • CoffeeScript brewing as variation on JavaScript

    CoffeeScript, billed by its creator as "unfancy JavaScript," is in development as a language that compiles into JavaScript but offers a different sense of style.

  • Developers rest easier with JavaScript reversal

    The programmers in the trenches of Web development can breathe a bit easier now that a major committee planning the future of the JavaScript standard has decided to focus on small, incremental changes that will improve the performance in Web browsers. Some members of the ECMA International standards committee still have bigger dreams to enhance the language, known more formally as ECMAScript, to tackle more complicated projects, but these plans receded as the group focused on clearer and more present needs.