it strategy - News, Features, and Slideshows

Features

  • Microsoft scrambles to simplify its licensing

    Microsoft is pledging dramatic improvements to its notoriously complex enterprise licensing, but experts are skeptical about the potential impact of the plan.

  • Foiled! How to beat software vendors' sneaky price increases

    Between complex licenses and the cloud, Microsoft, Oracle, and SAP have lots of ways to hike up prices. Here's how to fight back

  • After getting star billing, Oracle's Fusion Applications take a supporting role

    Last week's OpenWorld conference made on thing clear: Oracle remains committed to its next-generation Fusion Applications but massive growth in the product line is probably not around the corner.

  • Oracle's Q4 results: What to watch for

    Many eyes in the tech world will fall on Oracle later this week, when the vendor's fourth-quarter results are set for release. This is typically the biggest reporting period for Oracle each year in terms of revenue, but a number of questions loom beyond its top-line performance.

  • Prism doesn't have CIOs in a panic -- yet

    Revelations over the U.S. National Security Agency's Prism surveillance program have much of the general public in uproar, but in terms of the controversy's impact to enterprise IT, some CIOs have measured, albeit watchful reactions.

  • 5 strategic tips for avoiding a big data bust

    Failed expectations, increased costs, unnecessary legal risks -- going blind into a big data project doesn’t pay

  • Cisco vs. Juniper: How different are their SDN strategies?

    On the surface, Cisco and Juniper's SDN strategies seem to have sharp contrasts if recent announcements are any indication.

  • Analyst, SAP dispute over reported support discounts reveals murky picture

    SAP and a financial analyst are at loggerheads over a recent report by the analyst, which said that a handful of customers had received substantial discounts on their software maintenance renewals.

  • 7 outsourcing nightmares -- and how to avoid them

    Poor communication, shortsighted contracts -- don't get derailed by an IT outsourcing agreement gone awry

  • With thick skin, Google CIO finds job rewarding

    When Ben Fried left his post as IT managing director at Morgan Stanley and took over as Google's CIO in May 2008, he knew what he was getting into: supporting a user base full of technology experts and computer industry stars, like co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin, CEO Eric Schmidt and Vice President Vint Cerf. In a recent interview with IDG News Service, Fried spoke candidly about his job and shared tips and advice for fellow CIOs, including the urgent need for tablet device strategies. An edited transcript of the interview follows.

  • Wikis that work: Four IT departments get it right

    When you're one of just two technology managers tasked with supporting a geographically dispersed user base, any kind of self-help technology that takes the burden off IT is welcomed with open arms. That's why Ernest Kayinamura of Enel North America and his lone counterpart have actively embraced wikis as a way to make IT materials more accessible to the end users they support.

  • Economy puts IT into penny-pinching mode

    With the economy struggling and financial markets in a state of chaos, this is becoming a hard time to be an IT manager.

  • US innovation: On the skids

    It would be hard to exaggerate the angst that has gripped the US in recent months as the election nears, markets churn and assets melt. But the headlines that have made us dread picking up the newspaper mask a long-term problem that may shape the future of America more than John McCain's plan for Iraq, Barack Obama's health care ideas or Uncle Sam's heroic efforts to rescue the economy.

  • Dear Mr. President: Let's talk tech

    Science and technology may not have been the focus of the recent debates between presidential hopefuls John McCain and Barack Obama, but both candidates have outlined some broad policy proposals and goals. That's a good thing, because, as some of the top technology thinkers in the United States today recently shared with Computerworld, the next president will have to tackle the country's ongoing decline in global technological competitiveness.

  • The three business tech risks you don't know about

    Business travelers will soon need to carry the name of their corporate lawyer in addition to their passport when traveling to the United States, and they may need to bring with them a different business laptop as well. This is because US Customs can search and confiscate your laptop without any prior cause, according to policies that have been posted online since a Ninth US Circuit Court ruling in April.

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