IT management

IT management - News, Features, and Slideshows

News

  • New IBM service shines a light on mobile device and app performance

    With mobile devices rapidly becoming the tools of choice for enterprise work, IBM wants to help IT departments make sure they can serve all users.

  • Disruptive technology: Dead companies do tell tales

    Blockbuster. Nokia. Kodak. Most businesspeople know what they have in common. They are all companies whose footsteps you don't want to follow.

  • ISS says Microsoft's Nadella is paid too much

    A prominent advisor to big-time investors has urged clients to vote against Microsoft's pay package for its new CEO, Satya Nadella, saying that his compensation this year was out of whack when compared to competing companies and the firm's track record.

  • Managing BYOD expenses: How to get it right

    Bring your own device (BYOD) has become an accepted practice in business. Gartner predicts that by 2017, half of all employers will require workers to supply their own devices for work. Yet there are mixed reports about whether BYOD actually saves businesses money.

  • Air Force veteran to IT: ‘Live your dreams'

    Retired Air Force Major Brian Shul isn't an IT expert, but his story of survival and recovery captivated the IT audience at a national management conference.

  • How automation could take your skills -- and your job

    Nicholas Carr's essay IT Doesn't Matter in the Harvard Business Review in 2003, and the later book, argued that IT is shifting to a service delivery model comparable to electric utilities. It produced debate and defensiveness among IT managers over the possibility that they were sliding to irrelevancy. It's a debate that has yet to be settled. But what is clear is that Carr has a talent for raising timely questions, and he has done so again in his latest work The Glass Cage, Automation and Us (W.W. Norton & Co.)

  • IT hiring edges up: Why? Take your pick

    Whenever IT hiring picks up, as it did last month, the default explanation from analysts is this: The economy is improving.

  • Companies use urban office locations to attract IT talent

    To attract workers in the competitive technology job market, remote connectivity service provider LogMeIn decided that a change of address was needed.

  • The IT freelance economy is growing, but not at large firms

    The type of company you work for may have a lot to do with whether you're hired as a full-time employee or a contract or contingent worker.

  • Microsoft Office advancements are a boost for BYOD programs

    Microsoft is giving corporate BYOD programs a boost by upgrading its Office offerings for iPhone, iPad and Android to deliver more features free, increasing the likelihood that mobile workers will have better tools available to be more productive.

  • What Gamergate says about the tech industry

    For the last two months the video-game industry has been embroiled in an ugly outbreak of name-calling and worse. This dustup, called Gamergate, was named after a hashtag on Twitter, where much of the nasty fight has taken place. It's a battle in which women have been threatened with violence and even death by hardcore gamers. The women's crime, in their eyes: They criticized what they see as the anti-woman, anti-gay, racist nature of games and many people in the industry.

  • Startup Capriza scores $27M to Zapp legacy apps into mobile ones

    Capriza, a startup that helps enterprises convert their legacy apps into mobile- and cloud-based ones, Thursday announced it has racked up an additional $27 million in venture funding. That should be enough to help Capriza scale its business on the marketing and sales side, and maybe even have enough left over to afford a drummer and bassist to form a company band (more on that later...).

  • Tech support's NSFW problem

    As the recent scandal over leaked celebrity photographs reminded us all, people use their electronic devices for very personal pursuits in the era of smartphone ubiquity. Depending on the age and inclination of its owner, a modern-day digital device might contain not just nude selfies like those that were shared online, but images from dating sites like Tinder and Grindr, creepshots, or other salacious or even illegal material downloaded from the backwaters of "the dark Web" via anonymizers like Tor.

  • Feds set to destroy H-1B records

    The U.S. has changed its H-1B record retention policy to the concern of people who study the visa's impact on the workforce and economy.

  • For big raises in IT, look to mobile, security, big data

    IT salaries will remain mostly stagnant in 2015, except for workers with highly coveted skill sets, according to a report tracking IT salaries and skills demand in the coming years.